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Why You Shouldnt Eat Raw or Undercooked Chicken and How To Keep it Fresh – Health Essentials from Cleveland Clinic

Posted: July 29, 2021 at 1:52 am

Eating raw or undercooked meat is something most people dont worry too much about, but it can happen from time to time. Whether youre being adventurous for your next meal or chowing down on some chicken that needed a little more time on the grill, its a danger you need to keep in mind.

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To better understand the dangers of eating raw or undercooked chicken and what you can do to protect yourself, we spoke with registered dietician Mia DiGeronimo, RD.

Despite whatever reason you may hear, you should never eat raw or rare chicken. Raw chicken can have bacteria that can cause food poisoning, says DiGeronimo. The most common bacterial food poisoning from chicken include:

And food poisoning isnt just a brief thing, either. Symptoms can begin within a few hours of consuming the food and, depending on the bacteria, DiGeronimo notes, the illness can last up to a week.

Symptoms of food poisoning can include fever, stomach cramping, diarrhea, and sometimes nausea and vomiting, she says. Plus those symptoms particularly diarrhea and vomiting can lead to dehydration, too, so drink plenty of water.

But theres a possibility of even more lasting damage, depending on your immune system. Patients with weakened immune systems, such as those with a diagnosis of AIDS or those going through chemotherapy, can have worsened symptoms and more severe complications from food poisoning, says DiGeronimo.

Depending on the bacteria, you may need an antibiotics prescription, too, she adds. Patients can get a stool test done to determine what type of bacteria it is. Bacteremia where bacteria spread to different parts of the body via your bloodstream is also a danger, particularly for those with immunity issues.

The big thing about protecting yourself from food poisoning, DiGeronimo says, is making sure you cook your chicken to an internal temperature of 165 F. Dont just trust your instincts when cooking; use a clean meat thermometer for accurate temperature readings.

Besides properly cooking your chicken, though, there are other ways to make sure your chicken stays fresh.

If youre refrigerating raw chicken, keep it in its original packing for no more than two days, says DiGeronimo. Store your raw chicken on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator, away from any fresh fruits, vegetables and other foods, she says.

If youre storing your chicken longer than two days, its best to freeze it, she adds. And, yes, you can freeze it in its original packaging. Just be sure to thaw it out over time in your refrigerator and cook it as soon as its thawed.

Your raw chicken should stay fresh up to two days in the refrigerator (at or below 40 F) but up to one year in the freezer (at 0 F), says DiGeronimo.

And how long can raw chicken sit out of the refrigerator when youre preparing it or grocery shopping?Ideally, DiGeronimo says, you should get your perishable items into your fridge as soon as possible. Sometimes, though, you might have to make multiple stops on a grocery run and you cant get your chicken into the fridge right away.

If thats the case, or if you just happen to accidentally leave your chicken out on the counter once you get home, you still have some time. Its safe to leave items needing refrigeration out on the counter at room temperature for up to two hours, she says.

Raw chicken should be cold to touch when buying at the store or before cooking at home, says DiGeronimo. The chicken should also be pink and moist but not slimy. If the color of your chicken is off or its slimy, thats a sign its gone bad.

And, of course, theres the smell test. Fresh raw chicken should have a slight smell, but if its a funky, rotten odor, you need to ditch that fowl meat.

To ensure your chicken doesnt go bad, dont thaw it in the sink or on the counter. The best way to thaw chicken is in the refrigerator, in cold water or the microwave, she says.

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Why You Shouldnt Eat Raw or Undercooked Chicken and How To Keep it Fresh - Health Essentials from Cleveland Clinic

"Safe" Investments Are Eating Away At Your Wealth – Banyan Hill Publishing

Posted: July 29, 2021 at 1:52 am

Its a tough market for investors who like to play it safe.

In these volatile markets, many are turning to Treasury bonds or other fixed income assets.

Big mistake!

In todays video, I share 10 charts that illustrate how these safe investments are eating away at your wealth.

I also offer an alternative that can help you avoid most of the risk but can deliver market-beating gains.

Safety isnt safe these days. And its not just Treasury bonds.

The average U.S. personal savings account now returns about 0.1% or $100 per $100,000 in annual interest. But you need income of $1,283 per $100,000 just to keep up with inflation.

Thats been the pattern since 2009.

Whats the best alternative to throwing money away right now?

Last years growth darlings and special-purpose acquisition companies are far too risky. But right in my own Bauman Letter, a group of stocks has been beating the market all year.

Watch todays video to learn what can provide you quality gains and beat the current alternatives.

Click here to watch this weeks video or click on the image below:

(Click here to view video.)

Kind regards,

Ted BaumanEditor, The Bauman Letter

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"Safe" Investments Are Eating Away At Your Wealth - Banyan Hill Publishing

Best practices and opportunities for integrating nutrition specific into nutrition sensitive interventions in fragile contexts: a systematic review -…

Posted: July 29, 2021 at 1:52 am

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Excerpt from:
Best practices and opportunities for integrating nutrition specific into nutrition sensitive interventions in fragile contexts: a systematic review -...

Brisbane’s Night Cafe has been a constant that homeless youth have relied on for 20 years – ABC News

Posted: July 29, 2021 at 1:52 am

Outside BrisbaneCity Hall on a Thursday nightpeople wait for buses or dart across King George Square on their way home.

All thewhile a growing queue of young people, some on scooters, some in groups, congregate down the side of the iconic building and wait for the Night Cafe to open its doors.

Waiting inside, at the bottom of a staircase that leads into City Hall's basement, is a team of youth workers, doctors, nurses, and other volunteers.

ABC Radio Brisbane: Edwina Seselja

"Here at the Brisbane Night Cafe we provide young people aged 12 to 25 who are homeless or at risk of homelessnessa safe space to come and get a hot meal, clothing, hygiene products, have a shower, or speak to our volunteer nurses or doctors" Red Cross youth worker Eboni Frankel told ABC Radio Brisbane.

The Red Cross's Night Cafe opens onTuesday and Thursday evenings, and this yearmarked 20 years of operation.

Aside from the two youth workers and a supervisor, the team is made up of volunteers.

"We have a huge team of amazing volunteers who donate their time to assist the young people in the community who are in need," Ms Frankel said.

ABC Radio Brisbane: Edwina Seselja

When the doors open and the smell of roast beef and potato bake wafts out onto Adelaide Street, the young people trickle down the stairs into the bright, welcoming space and take a seat at a booth or gather around a table.

Some, who look cold and tired, come in, eat in silence, rest for a moment and leave.

Others are in and out within minutes, grabbing a meal to go, a few items ofclothing and hygiene products.

ABC Radio Brisbane: Edwina Seselja

And then there are those who come with friends. Tight-knit groups who look like they are at a school cafeteria, laughing and talking as they eat around the table.

The overwhelming majority of the young people on this night were under 18 and ofIndigenous orPacific Islander background.

ABC Radio Brisbane: Edwina Seselja

Ms Frankel says the young people who come through the door are all different and each is dealing with a different set of circumstances.

"When we think of the word homelessness, the first thing that comes to our mind is someone on the street, living out of a bag but that's not always the case," Ms Frankel said.

"We have a lot of young people here who identify as homeless they could be sleeping on a friend's couch, so sleeping anywhere that they find with a roof.

"It doesn't just have to be someone sleeping on the street, it's someone who just doesn't have a stable, secure home that they can go home to."

ABC Radio Brisbane: Edwina Seselja

With that comes a wide rangeof health concerns according toSunny Street volunteer nurse Elise Hicks who helps operate a clinic at the Night Cafe.

"A lot of these kids are on the streets because sometimes they are safer than home," Ms Hicks said.

"So there's a lot of trauma, whether it's physical or emotional.

"We see issues here like self-harming, overdoses from different substances, and sometimes wounds from being barefoot.

"They are sleeping in the garden so they've got multiple infected midge bites and stuff like that."

ABC Radio Brisbane: Edwina Seselja

For 18-year-old man Suli, the Night Cafe is as much an opportunity to connect with people as it is to have a hot meal.

The Sudanese refugee who lost a lot of family to warsays he has been coming here most of his life.

"I really value community and trust in an organisation [such] as [the Red Cross]," he said.

"And to be groupednot by other things, but by what we have inside.

"I feel very strongly connected to everybody herewho has been a part of my experience, of growth."

ABC Radio Brisbane: Edwina Seselja

For the youth workers like Ms Frankel, that is why she does what she does.

"We like to provide just an overall safespace, judgement-free zone for these young people to come in and feel they are loved and know that they are cared about," she said.

"We help to link them in with services they need, when they are ready.

"They talk about us and they're excited to come to us every Tuesday and Thursday, and we really pride ourselves on knowing that we're something that they can look forward to in their day."

ABC Radio Brisbane: Edwina Seselja

Twenty-nine-year-old Marissa Bercolliembodiesthat pride as one of the volunteers who make the service possible.

"I always thought about wanting to give back but I never really made an effort to do it," she said.

After finding out about the Night Cafe, she now wonders why she waited so long.

"Jump online, find out what's happening and what's available in your community," she said.

"Just do it and make a commitment to positive change in your community."

Read this article:
Brisbane's Night Cafe has been a constant that homeless youth have relied on for 20 years - ABC News

Australian Olympian Tilly Kearns reveals COVID-safe measures while eating in the Olympic Village – Newcastle Herald

Posted: July 29, 2021 at 1:51 am

news, local-news, covid, tokyo, olympics, australia, tilly, kearns, tiktok, coronavirus

Australian water polo player Tilly Kearns has revealed how she and her teammates keep COVID-safe while eating at the Olympic dining hall in Tokyo as Japan battles more than 34,000 active cases. The 20-year-old Australian filmed a video documenting a typical lunchtime meal at the Olympic village, which she posted to TikTok on Wednesday. The video begins with Kearns and her teammates wearing face masks as they walked into the dining hall. "First we sanitise (our hands) and then put these gloves on before we touch anything. We go and grab one of these trays - each individual tray has been sanitised and washed," Kearns said in the clip. She then panned across the dining hall, which looked like a food court divided by different cuisines and dishes, such as noodles, stir-fried, grilled and steamed dishes. After collecting their food, the teammates made their way to a table, which was divided by transparent plastic screens to create individual cubicles for diners. "It makes mealtime conversations pretty difficult because it is hard to hear through them (the cubicles),' Kearns said. "In every little cubicle there are disinfectant wipes so we wipe down everything that we're going to touch. The screen, the sides, the chair - everything." Kearns said the Australian women's water polo team, also known as the 'Aussie Stingers', have a "team rule that once the (face) mask is off, you only have ten minutes to eat to reduce the exposure". "Then after we eat, we sanitise again and put a fresh mask on, pick up our scraps with the disinfectant wipe and sanitise again on the way out," she said. Kearns and her teammates seem to be taking every precaution against COVID-19 as 75 people linked to Tokyo2020 have tested positive to the disease, including six athletes, according to the public database. Tokyo recorded 1,832 new cases on Wednesday, which is the highest number since early January. Meanwhile, Japan is currently grappling with a total of 34,410 active cases, according to The Japan Times. Kearns and the Aussie Stingers are set to face off against Canada in their first-round game on Saturday.

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WATCH

July 22 2021 - 6:00PM

Let an Aussie athlete explain how they dine safely in Tokyo

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Australian Olympian Tilly Kearns reveals COVID-safe measures while eating in Tokyo's Olympic Village - as Japan battles more than 34,000 active cases.

news, local-news, covid, tokyo, olympics, australia, tilly, kearns, tiktok, coronavirus

2021-07-22T18:00:00+10:00

https://players.brightcove.net/3879528182001/default_default/index.html?videoId=6264682176001

https://players.brightcove.net/3879528182001/default_default/index.html?videoId=6264682176001

Australian water polo player Tilly Kearns has revealed how she and her teammates keep COVID-safe while eating at the Olympic dining hall in Tokyo as Japan battles more than 34,000 active cases.

The 20-year-old Australian filmed a video documenting a typical lunchtime meal at the Olympic village, which she posted to TikTok on Wednesday.

The video begins with Kearns and her teammates wearing face masks as they walked into the dining hall.

"First we sanitise (our hands) and then put these gloves on before we touch anything. We go and grab one of these trays - each individual tray has been sanitised and washed," Kearns said in the clip.

She then panned across the dining hall, which looked like a food court divided by different cuisines and dishes, such as noodles, stir-fried, grilled and steamed dishes.

After collecting their food, the teammates made their way to a table, which was divided by transparent plastic screens to create individual cubicles for diners.

"It makes mealtime conversations pretty difficult because it is hard to hear through them (the cubicles),' Kearns said.

"In every little cubicle there are disinfectant wipes so we wipe down everything that we're going to touch. The screen, the sides, the chair - everything."

The dining hall in the Tokyo Olympics village.

Kearns said the Australian women's water polo team, also known as the 'Aussie Stingers', have a "team rule that once the (face) mask is off, you only have ten minutes to eat to reduce the exposure".

"Then after we eat, we sanitise again and put a fresh mask on, pick up our scraps with the disinfectant wipe and sanitise again on the way out," she said.

Kearns and her teammates seem to be taking every precaution against COVID-19 as 75 people linked to Tokyo2020 have tested positive to the disease, including six athletes, according to the public database.

Tokyo recorded 1,832 new cases on Wednesday, which is the highest number since early January.

Meanwhile, Japan is currently grappling with a total of 34,410 active cases, according to The Japan Times.

Kearns and the Aussie Stingers are set to face off against Canada in their first-round game on Saturday.

Read more here:
Australian Olympian Tilly Kearns reveals COVID-safe measures while eating in the Olympic Village - Newcastle Herald

Family Meals That Deliver Flavor and Nutrition – Amsterdam News

Posted: July 29, 2021 at 1:51 am

As kids and parents return to busy schedules full of sports, homework and weeknight activities, building a plan for nutritious and easy meals can be challenging. Piecing together a menu that fuels active minds without spending hours in the kitchen is a common goal for many families.

These recipes require minimal prep and call for on-hand ingredients like dairy food favorites that provide nutrients people of all ages need to grow and maintain strong bodies and minds.

Whether you enjoy it together in the morning before getting the day started or mix it up with breakfast for dinner, this Sustainable Frittata is called sustainable because you can use leftover cheeses, veggies, ham, sausage and more to recycle ingredients you already have on hand. For a customizable kid-pleaser, turn to Chopped Chicken Taco Salad and garnish with your familys favorite toppings.

Visit HYPERLINK "https://www.milkmeansmore.org/?utm_source=familyfeatures&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=" l "15827-UnitedDairyIndustryOfMichigan"milkmeansmore.org to find more recipes perfect for bringing loved ones together.

Chopped Chicken Taco Salad

Recipe courtesy of Megan Gundy of What Megans Making on behalf of Milk Means More

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cook time: 15 minutes

Servings: 4

Dressing:

1 cup plain Greek yogurt

1/3 cup buttermilk, plus additional (optional)

1 tablespoon fresh-squeezed lime juice, plus additional (optional)

3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

2 tablespoons taco seasoning

Salad:

2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts

2 tablespoons taco seasoning

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 head leaf lettuce, chopped

1 avocado, chopped into bite-sized pieces

1 cup black beans, drained and rinsed

1 cup corn

1 pint grape or cherry tomatoes, chopped

1 cup shredded cheese (Monterey Jack or Mexican)

tortilla strips or crushed tortilla chips, for topping

To make dressing: In small bowl, stir yogurt, buttermilk, lime juice, cilantro, and taco seasoning until combined. Taste and adjust lime juice and cilantro as needed. If dressing is too thick, add buttermilk 1 teaspoon at a time until desired consistency is reached. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

To make salad: Season chicken on both sides with taco seasoning. Heat large skillet over medium-high heat and add olive oil. Add chicken to pan and cook on both sides until outside is golden brown and chicken is cooked through. Remove to cutting board and slice into strips.

On large platter, heap chopped lettuce. Sprinkle chicken over top. Add avocado, beans, corn, tomatoes and shredded cheese. Drizzle dressing on top and sprinkle with tortilla strips or crushed tortilla chips.

Sustainable Frittata

Recipe courtesy of Jenn Fillenworth of Jenny With the Good Eats on behalf of Milk Means More

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 20 minutes

Servings: 8

12 eggs, beaten

1/4 cup whole milk, half and half or heavy cream

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 cups shredded cheese, any variety

3 cups assorted cooked vegetables and pre-cooked meats

fresh herbs, for garnish (optional)

Preheat oven to 450F.

Preheat cast-iron pan or oven-safe skillet over medium heat.

In large bowl, mix eggs, milk and salt then add shredded cheese.

Add cooked vegetables and meats to pan to reheat. Once vegetables have softened, add egg mixture to pan and scramble. Let sit over medium heat 1 minute.

Carefully transfer to oven and bake 10-15 minutes. Frittata is done when eggs have set. Remove from oven and top with fresh herbs.

Read more:
Family Meals That Deliver Flavor and Nutrition - Amsterdam News

The Military Diet Is a Fast-Track to Weight Loss Until It Isnt – Fatherly

Posted: July 29, 2021 at 1:50 am

If youve gained weight over the last several months, we dont blame you. But for the purposes of your health heart disease is the leading killer of men in the U.S. you probably want to drop those added pounds. For men who hate diets and just want to get it over and done with, the military diet promises to deliver. Proponents claim you can lose up to 10 pounds in one week. But like all types of yo-yo dieting, the military diet could be even worse on your health than being overweight.

The military diet prescribes a week-long cycle of three days on and four days off, repeated as many times as you need to reach your goal weight. Days one through three require a very restrictive intake of 1,100-1,400 calories, followed by four days of eating up to 1,500 calories still pretty low, says dietician Liz Weinandy of Ohio State Universitys Wexner Medical Center. For comparison, health experts typically recommend that adults eat between 2,000 and 2,500 calories a day.

Despite its name, the military diet is not affiliated with the United States military or any known armed force. In fact, it has no discernable connection to what service members actually eat: High amounts of protein, fat, and carbohydrates for intense days of training and combat.

Instead, the diet gets its name from the discipline and willpower it takes to stay on the diet and follow it, just like the willpower and discipline it takes to stay in the military, according to themilitarydiet.com. Willpower is needed, it seems, since youll be feeling the hunger from such a prohibitive nutrition plan.

Though the calorie count is low, the military diet allows for a fairly even spread of carbohydrates, fats, and protein and it even includes ice cream. Technically, you can eat whatever you want on the diet as long as it stays within your calorie quota, but the example meal plans on the diets website are fairly well-balanced.

This is what a sample day on the diet looks like:

Alcohol and sodas are no-nos, but coffee is allowed provided you subtract five calories from your food intake elsewhere for each cup you consume. You can make substitutions for certain foods in the military diet meal plans if you just cant stomach them or if you need to make the plan vegetarian or vegan. For example, you can swap half an avocado and two tablespoons or hummus for a can of tuna.

No scientific research has looked into the military diets weight loss claims. But the raw arithmetic does speak for itself, Weinandy says. Consuming fewer calories than your body needs will inevitably lead to a short-term drop on the scale, though probably not as much as ten pounds in one week.

If theres one good thing about the military diet, its that all the recommended foods are things you might already be buying at the grocery store, like canned tuna, apples, and peanut butter. Its nothing extravagant or crazy, she says. In fact, if you double some of the portion sizes and add in more servings of fruits and vegetables, the plan has a lot of the building blocks of a healthy, whole food-focused diet.

While the military diets website couches its claims by saying it works best for weight-loss emergencies, Weinandy says the boom-and-bust cycles of short-term dieting arent sustainable and can be unhealthy. Once you abandon the military diet plan youre going to gain the weight back, she says, full stop. Its not going to work long-term. Repeated crash dieting can even slow metabolic rate in the long run.

Fad diets can also exacerbate or even be the root cause of disordered eating, which Weinandy has seen in people of all genders. She would never recommend that teenagers, people who are pregnant, and people who are breastfeeding go on the military diet or any similar plan. And exercising on this low-calorie regimen isnt a good idea, either, because you could easily get dehydrated. On so few calories, your body is really just trying to keep up with your regular bodily processes, Weinandy says. Military-style conditioning drills are off the table.

There are some instances when a plan like the military diet could be recommended by dieticians, but theyre rare, according to Weinandy. Patients preparing for gastric bypass or other weight-loss surgeries are sometimes put on very low-calorie diets to reduce abdominal fat and help the procedure go smoothly, she says. But theyre really isolated cases.

Though the immediate results can be gratifying, Weinandy has seen countless patients gain it all back and more after they come off a short-term solution like the military diet. Your best alternative is to fill your plate with whole foods, exercise regularly, and cut out processed snacks if youre trying to lose weight. Youve probably heard it before, but these small steps will lead to healthy, lasting results whereas fads like the military diet only bounce you between weight loss and weight gain, Weinandy says. I just hate to see people on this merry-go-round.

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The Military Diet Is a Fast-Track to Weight Loss Until It Isnt - Fatherly

Weight loss story: "I minimized white food from my diet while Intermittent Fasting" | The Times of India – Times of India

Posted: July 29, 2021 at 1:50 am

I followed intermittent fasting as my weight loss strategy, adapted the 16/8 method and kept my eating window is from 10:30 am to 6:30 PM so my meals are as follows:

My breakfast: Around 10:30 am I break my fast. My breakfast mostly be porridge made of millets, lentils [Sathumaavu kanji], Ragi koozhu [porridge] along with a bowl of boiled Sundal or any seasonal fruits.

My lunch: Between 1-1:30 PM is my lunchtime. I make my lunch plate filled with more colours and minimize white. I take a bowl of rice or millet and sambar/dal/broth anything that I make for others, add sundal, poriyal/vegetables and mandatorily a cup of raitha added with either onions, tomato, carrot, cucumber or capsicum. In this template of plate I fill up and make sure no gaps and I do not refill my plate. Sit back and take every single bit slowly and enjoy my meal.

My dinner: I wind up the last meal of the day around 6:30 PM. For my dinner, it will be basic south Indian tiffin items such as Idly, dosa, upma, Pongal and sometimes I will make a buddha bowl and a cup of soup. Between 6:30 PM to next morning at 10:30 AM I dont intake anything other than water.

Pre-workout meal: Its just lukewarm water and nothing else

Post-workout meal: Nothing but water since I work out during my fasting hours.

I indulge in (What you eat on your cheat days): I dont believe in cheat days after adapting this intermittent fasting and healthy eating pattern. I dont binge however to satisfy my soul I ensure I am limiting myself within the calorie limit for the day and enjoy fried rice, pizza and sweets if I wish [especially only within my eating window].

Continued here:
Weight loss story: "I minimized white food from my diet while Intermittent Fasting" | The Times of India - Times of India

Hormonal Belly: Signs, Causes, and Weight Loss Tips – Greatist

Posted: July 29, 2021 at 1:50 am

Belly fat can be tricky to ditch. Thats probably why its one of the most common problems posed to Dr. Google.

And there isnt always a simple solution. Its not always the case, but belly fat could be linked to your hormones. Keep scrolling for a deep dive into the causes and solutions for hormonal belly.

Your diet hasnt changed. Your gym schedule is the same. But for some reason, your bellys different. What gives?

These are some signs that somethings up in Hormone Town.

More often than not, belly fat can be traced to your diet. But if your tummys popping despite a steady diet and lifestyle, your weight gain could be hormonal.

Hormone levels can change for a variety of reasons outside your control, including:

Belly weight gain could just mean that your estrogen or testosterone levels are fluctuating because youre getting older. But if you havent changed your lifestyle and you arent approaching middle age, chat with your doctor about checking for underlying health conditions.

Hormonal belly often comes with a side of sadness, rage, or a wild combo of the two. Thats because when your hormones go haywire, your whole body is affected.

Most folks with vaginas go through menopause between the ages of 45 and 55. Its typically known as the time when Aunt Flow leaves town, but the sudden drop in estrogen triggers other changes too. Vaginal dryness, hot flashes, and even weight gain can all be symptoms.

Testosterone levels can drop with age, too. And whether its age-related or not, testosterone deficiency can cause:

The same hormones that mess with your libido (estrogen and testosterone) can impact your waistline.

Research suggests that menopause (again, a season of *major* hormone upheaval) often leads to a sexual dry spell. Studies also show that it can lead to weight gain and increased visceral fat, which usually accumulates in the belly.

Not all hormones are related to sex. Your adrenal glands release the hormone cortisol in response to stress. Cortisol also plays a major role in metabolism regulation, inflammation management, and blood sugar levels.

Basically, chronic stress can lead to chronically high cortisol. Thats a one-way ticket to a big appetite and high blood sugar. (Next stop: belly fat!)

Burning the candle at both ends can lead to hormonal belly. Whether intentional or not, skimping on sleep can have major health consequences, from slashing your sex drive to boosting your appetite.

In particular, lack of sleep messes with cortisol (that stress hormone), leptin (the hormone that tells your brain to stop eating), and ghrelin (the hormone that increases your appetite). Sounds like a recipe for hormonal belly, right?

One 2019 study found that even folks who tried to make up for lost sleep by sleeping in on the weekends still experienced hormonal fluctuations, weight gain, and increased calorie intake.

Were not talking about wanting a cookie now and then. But if you cant deal without your sugar top-up each day, step back and ask yourself why. Cravings are often an early clue to hormone issues.

You may have leptin resistance. Remember, leptin is the hormone that helps regulate your appetite. It tells your brain when your belly is full. If your body starts ignoring leptins messages, thats called leptin resistance.

Researchers know that leptin resistance leads to weight gain. Talk to your doctor if you dont feel full even after big meals. Leptin resistance could be a problem, and it could be leading to overeating.

It could be an insulin issue. Another hormonal cause of belly fat? Insulin imbalance. Wild sugar cravings, sudden weight gain, and lack of focus could all indicate insulin issues. There are natural ways to lower insulin, but its also a concern you should bring up with your doctor.

Theres no magic fix for hormonal weight gain. Your game plan depends on which hormones are wonky and why. But these five tactics are a good place to start.

Theres a reason cortisol has been dubbed the stress hormone. Chronically high cortisol levels whether theyre from never-ending stress or Cushings syndrome can trigger weight gain, insulin resistance, and more.

So start tackling your hormonal belly by tackling your stress. Try meditation. Take a yoga class. Give mindful breathing a whirl.

Sleeping on your sleep habits? Nows the time to get serious.

Research has linked restless nights with a higher body mass index (BMI). Aim for 7 or 8 hours per night to help regulate hormones and bring a healthy rhythm back to your digestive system. Theres truly no substitute for sleep. Your brain and body need it to rest, reset, and keep your hormones in working order.

Diet can play a major role in hormone cycles. When hormones (insulin in particular) go haywire, your body might store up extra belly fat or even develop type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, consistently eating high fiber foods can set your insulin on the straight and narrow.

Set yourself up for success by stocking your pantry with other nourishing, hormone-balancing foods like broccoli, chickpeas, lean proteins, and sour cherries (great for catching a few winks!).

Blood sugar spikes are no bueno for hormone regulation. You can tame your hormonal belly with a low glycemic diet, which focuses on foods that take longer to turn to sugar in your bloodstream.

Folks with hormonal belly from PCOS also report weight loss success by dialing down the sugar. Other tips include eating more protein and fiber.

Research suggests that alcohol consumption affects your hormones, even boosting estrogen in premenopausal women.

If you think your weight gain is hormonal, try ditching booze for a month. See if it makes a difference. It could be that your evening glass of vino has been jacking up your endocrine system behind the scenes.

Not convinced your hormones are to blame. Check yourself for any combo of these possible culprits.

Weight gain typically happens when youre consuming more calories than you burn. But sometimes belly fat can be the result of hormonal imbalances like wacky estrogen or testosterone levels. Stress and lack of sleep can also wreak hormone havoc.

You might be able to tackle hormonal belly with lifestyle changes. But if healthy eating, solid sleep, and stress reduction dont do the trick, its time to talk to your doctor. They can help you identify and fix a hormone imbalance.

Read this article:
Hormonal Belly: Signs, Causes, and Weight Loss Tips - Greatist

Raven-Symon Has Been Using These Supplements to Lose Weight | Eat This Not That – Eat This, Not That

Posted: July 29, 2021 at 1:50 am

Eat This, Not That! is reader-supported and every product we feature is independently vettedby our editors. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn a commission.

Raven-Symon has lost an impressive 30 pounds over the past few months, revealing to fans that a combination of intermittent fasting, low-carb eating, and light exercise were all essential parts of her weight loss journey.

Now, the star is opening up about the supplements that have been an integral part of her healthy living plan. Read on to discover the exact supplements Raven-Symon has taken to help her lose weight and boost her mood, energy, and immune health. And for more on how your favorite stars shape up, check out Gabrielle Union Says She Avoids These Two Foods in New Abs Selfie.

Raven-Symon is an avid proponent of fasting, incorporating Keto Chow's Fasting Drops into her routine when she's on her regular, water-only plan.

"I'm fixin' up my fasting lunch, breakfast, and dinner," she explained to her Instagram followers. "I have some water and iceI'm going to be putting in some fasting drops. This is my sodium and magnesium to really make sure my electrolytes stay up."

Related: Sign up for our newsletter for the latest celebrity food news.

To keep her energy and mood high during her fasts, Raven-Symon also relies on Keto Chow's Electrolyte Drops, "which is sodium, magnesium, potassium, and trace minerals from the Great Salt Lake," she told her Instagram followers while mixing up some water for an upcoming 36-hour fast.

Related: What Happens to Your Body When You Fast

When Raven-Symon wants a brain boost, she relies on Bright Minds' Memory Powder.

"I take a scoop of that every morningthis is to help feed my brain," she told her followers.

For more great additions to your AM routine, check out The #1 Best Supplement to Take in the Morning, Says Dietitian.

Raven-Symon says that Happy Saffron Plus supplements have been great for boosting her mood when she's feeling down.

"These are the things that have saved my entire emotional inner workingssome days I don't take them and my wife can really tell," she explained.

Related: The Best Supplements to Take for Stress, According to Dietitians

To help keep her immune system strong, Raven-Symon supplements with Vitamins K2+D3 from Wellabs, as well as an additional vitamin C supplement later in the day.

"Because of the world we live in right now, you need a lot of vitamin D and a lot of vitamin C to keep things on the up and up," she told her followers.

For some great additions to your grocery list, check out the Best Supplements To Buy at Costco, Say Experts.

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Raven-Symon Has Been Using These Supplements to Lose Weight | Eat This Not That - Eat This, Not That


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