Search Weight Loss Topics:

Page 11234..1020..»

The Flaws of Six Popular Diets

Posted: December 19, 2014 at 10:32 am

There are so many diets out there, and all of them claim to be based on good science and nutrition theory. Unfortunately, most of these diets don’t provide everything that a person needs to be healthy, or are too difficult to follow for the benefits that they offer. There are so many people in the United States that are overweight, and looking for a way to enhance and improve their health through the manipulation of their body composition, but many diets end up doing more harm than good in the long run, or are simply too difficult and unfeasible for all but the most tempered dieters.

The majority of the diets that are popular have something on the table that provides them with a sense of legitimacy, but often, they go too far with certain themes, or only follow certain aspects of what we know makes a healthy diet, while ignoring other important parts of good nutrition. On top of that, people tend to selectively follow their chosen diet, curbing or completely negating its effectiveness, or leading to issues related to poor nutrition, because they are missing out on certain important things that the body needs.

Of course, even the most scientifically flawed diet can be effective in many circumstances, because exercise and caloric restriction are two drastically important aspects of good diet, and a big part of most diets is eliminating foods that are proven to be bad for you, even though the recommendations regarding what to eat don’t provide real, scientifically-backed results.

The following are six weight loss philosophies that are based on some scientific ideas while ultimately giving way to weight loss myth.

What’s Wrong with the Low-Fat Diet?

There are three primary categories of energy that we take in through diet: Protein, Carbs, and Fats. We need some of all of these to function at our best. Many diets suggest significantly restricting the consumption of fats, based on science rooted in the Eighties and Nineties. It’s true that too much fat is very bad for you, but making a diet that revolves around not getting enough fat through the diet is a big problem as well.

During this era, margarine and carbohydrates were considered healthier than fats, and it was believed that saturated fat led to heart issues such as atherosclerosis and blocked arteries. In retrospect, the trans-fats that we were eating during this era were far more dangerous than saturated fats that are still recommended to be eaten in moderation.

Perhaps the biggest problem with Low-Fat Diets (aside from the dangerous abuse of trans-fats during the era in which it was most popular) is that the body has to get energy from somewhere, and if you don’t eat enough fat, than its more likely that you will eat more carbs, which our bodies can directly convert into fat. The field of nutrition today has evolved significantly from this era, but many still erringly turn to Low-Fat Dieting in order to lose weight, and end up putting their health in jeopardy as a direct result.

What’s Wrong with the Low-Carb Diet?

As the science evolved and the public learned more about the science of losing weight, carbohydrates entered the spot-light as the new Worst Food. By the turn of the century, the most popular diets were those that recommended severely cutting carbs of all kinds. Carbs were (and still are to a large extent) the keystone of the American diet, and there is no doubt that we consume too many carbohydrates. With these Low-Carb Diets, it was possible to lose weight quickly by limiting the consumption of a variety of carb-loaded foods, including beer, bread, potatoes, and pasta.

Unfortunately, in spite of the Low-Carb diet’s ability to encourage weight loss, and even rapid weight loss, it is not the body’s natural, preferred state, and cutting carbs too strictly often leads successful dieters to gain weight again quickly, sometimes weighing more than before! Carbohydrates are the body’s go-to source for quick energy, and forgoing carbs altogether leads to fatigue and slows metabolism, because the body is converting proteins and fats into energy.

The big issue with Carbohydrates is Simple Carbs, like refined sugar, white bread, and white rice. Complex carbohydrates take work to be digested and provide nutrients and a feeling of fullness, whereas simple carbohydrates encourage overeating and spiked blood-sugar levels. With regard to a healthy diet, it is important to split calories equally from carbohydrates, proteins, and fats, while being smart and sourcing carbohydrates from healthy sources such as vegetables, fruits, yoghurt, beans, and whole grains.

What’s Wrong with the Paleo Diet?

In recent years, the Paleo, or Paleolithic Diet has become incredibly popular across the United States. The theory behind this sort of diet is simple—by eating what our ancestors ate and had access to, it’s possible to lose weight and maintain a healthier body. Most people that are on the Paleo Diet eat a lot of fish, chicken, and meat, along with veggies, fruits, and nuts. On the other hand, they forgo processed foods, milk products, beans, and grains. After reading about the last couple of diets, you can obviously see that there are some things that this diet gets right, especially regarding getting rid of processed foods in one’s diet.

On the other hand, there are certain aspects of this diet that aren’t grounded in medical science. Most people that aren’t lactose intolerant can drink milk without issue, and beans are a perfectly healthy source of nutrient-dense, carbohydrates. Also, with the way that products like grains and dairy are fortified, there are few effective sources left to get Vitamin D, and calcium can be a struggle as well.

In the end, the big issue with the Paleo Diet isn’t that it’s an ineffective diet—for the most part, it shares a lot in common with the “ideal diet.” The problem with it is that it is overly strict and leaves out some perfectly useful and healthy staple foods such as whole grains, beans, and dairy.

What is Wrong with the Gluten-Free Diet?

Another diet that is growing in popularity today is the Gluten-Free Diet. There is a particular form of protein, known as Gluten, which is highly prevalent in grains such as rye, barley, and wheat. There are a small minority of people that can legitimately benefit from the Gluten-Free Diet—People with Celiac Disease—A condition in which the presence of Gluten in the diet leads to immune system malfunction and major symptoms which impede health and wellness.

For all other people, there isn’t a clinical reason to stop eating foods with gluten in them. Many magazines and websites purport that going Gluten-Free can help people lose weight fast, but there is no reason for this to be so, aside for the fact that it makes people more conscientious about carbohydrates in general, but that has nothing to do with the philosophy behind the diet. Foods that are advertised as Gluten-Free are actually usually worse for the dieter than if they had gotten the real things, this is because they often have both more calories and more sugar.

People often also go Gluten-Free without doing the proper research, and end up missing out on minerals, vitamins, protein, and fiber that they would normally get from the foods they are cutting from their diet, because they don’t eat more meat, vegetables, and fruit to compensate.

Many people claim that they go Gluten-Free as a result of “Gluten Sensitivity,” which causes issues such as fatigue, headaches, diarrhea, cramps, and gas, but research shows that this isn’t true, and the majority of people that have this issue that they believe is related to gluten are mistaken, and they a sensitivity to a carb group known as FODMAPs, which is present in wheat, but also in a wide variety of foods that they are still eating including many vegetables, fruits, artificial sweeteners, and dairy products.

If you feel that you have issues with Gluten, don’t simply turn to a Gluten-Free diet. There are tests that you can take that can reveal your underlying food sensitivities and help you discover what you actually should be avoiding, and they can only be performed through a licensed medical professional or dietician.

What is Wrong with the Raw Food Diet?

Another recent diet that has become more prevalent, somewhat related to the Paleo Diet in its theoretical principle, is the Raw Food Diet. In this diet, one completely eschews any food that must be cooked, and only eats foods that can be eaten raw. Sometimes, the diet is less strict, allowing 1/4th of food eaten to be cooked. The idea with this diet is that the cooking process reduces the caloric benefits of the foods that we eat, and by eating raw foods, we receive an improved nutritional balance from the foods that we eat.

Many people use the Raw-Food Diet as a vegetarian diet, while others will cook meats and eat other foods raw. There are some that will even eat a varity of raw meats and other animal products, though this obviously leaves a person wide-open for food poisoning and animal-borne illness. With regard to the rest of the diet, there is some science behind it—For example, boiling or overcooking foods does degrade the nutritional content in many foods—But it assumes too much in many cases. For example, tomatoes provide improved nutritional content when cooked. For that reason, the ideal diet would likely include significant amounts of both cooked and raw foods.

This diet provides all of the nutrients that a person needs, but is very difficult to follow. It involves preparing meals at home and escewing dining out almost completely. In the end, the benefits of raw vs. cooked isn’t really worth the time, but it can help people lose weight by being more conscientious and avoiding processed foods.

What is Wrong with the High Fat Diet?

There is a new fad diet on the horizon, based off of the good data that we have that Fats aren’t as bad for you as once believed and Carbohydrates are consumed at unhealthy rates nationwide—The High Fat Diet. Many dieters are beginning to hear advice that by making fat the staple part of one’s diet, it is possible to improve health and lose weight.

Often, these diets claim that you can eat whatever you want, as long as you limit carbs, but this is simply not true. People load up on fat and start packing on pounds, even though they have restricted their carbs. Again, it’s important to focus on caloric balance among food-classes, while limiting total calories. Overemphasizing one branch is one of the best ways to introduce nutritional deficiencies or overeating into your diet!

People on High Fat diets are also more likely to have issues with elevated Triglyceride Levels. It is true that combining reduced carbs with increased fat consumption can increase HDL (healthy) cholesterol and reduce LDL (bad) cholesterol, but eating too much fat leads to a surplus of triglycerides, which are even more dangerous than high LDL Levels. High fat consumption can also lead to unhealthy levels of inflammation that inhibit the health of the body. Finally, if your high-fat diet is combined with elevated glucose levels, this significantly increases the risk associated with atherosclerosis and plaque formation.

Could a Revolutionary Weight Loss Strategy Be on the Horizon?

Posted: October 30, 2014 at 8:55 pm

Brown Fat Metabolism-Boosting Method Discovered

 

Obesity is a national epidemic in the United States, and a growing problem across the world. As more and more countries are stabilizing their food supplies, they begin to have to deal with issues like overeating and obesity more often. According to the WHO, there are almost 1.5 billion men and women across the world that are clinically obese or overweight. On top of that, there are more than forty million boys and girls under five years old that are at least overweight.

Weight LossOur bodies simplyaren’t designed to withstand obesity, and it it incredibly detrimental to our long term health. For example, the eating habits associated with obesity significantly increase the risk of Adult-Onset Diabetes. Type-2 Diabetes is a form of Insulin Resistance, which reduces the ability of the body to transport energy, in the form of glucose, to target cells throughout the body.

Obesity can even lead to infertility or suppressed fertility. Adipose fat encourages the conversion of Testosterone into Estrogen, which can lead to low sperm counts and erectile dysfunction in men. Obesity also increases the risk of heart disease, because poor diet leads to elevated cholesterol levels which increase the incidence of dangerous plaques, and high blood pressure which increases the risk of conditions such as heart attack or stroke.

There is even growing evidence that the hormone inbalance associated with Obesity increases the risk of neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Dementia, as well as reducing overall cognitive health and function via fatigue and reduced blood supply. Obviously, obesity is a dangerous epidemic, which has led governments, pharmaceutical companies, and other organizations to invest billions and billions of dollars into finding ways to help get this epidemic under control.

New research released in the academic journal, Nature, suggests that there may be a way to increase the rate at which a particular kind of fat metabolizes—known as brown fat—allowing it to be burned more quickly, leading to increased weight loss. Also, this research hypothesizes that it may be possible to even turn stored fat energy into brown fat, which can improve body composition and lead to a lower body weight. The lead investigator in this study was Thorsten Gnad, a German Researcher from the University of Bonn.

What Is the Difference Between White and Brown Fat?

There are two kinds of fat that are present in human beings and all mammals—white and brown fat, and both forms of fat perform significantly different functions and have very different metabolic profiles. White fat is the kind of fat that most people think of when they think about “fat.” White fat is distributed around the midsection and core of the body, and the body keeps this fat in case it needs an emergency source of energy. It’s also very difficult to burn this form of fat, because our bodies are designed to maintain it as a last resort.

Our bodies also have a second form of fat, however, known as brown fat. Brown fat is not stored for emergencies like white fat, but is burned constantly in order to keep body temperature stabilized and to keep us warm. In fact, the two categories of animals that have the most brown fat are babies which have just been born (including in humans) and mammals that go into hibernation.

Although human adults don’t carry as much brown fat around with them, they do still need and have some brown fat. Although human beings do carry around a lot of fat, the majority of this fat, by volume, is white fat. Women average around 25% bodyfat, whereas men average around 20%. Dependent upon the bodyfat composition of the individual, only between 3-7.5% of body weight is represented by brown fat.

The amount of brown fat that a person has is largely dependent upon their level of physical activity. People that exercise less don’t have as much brown fat as those that exercise regularly. This is because people that exercise regularly need more energy available to meet the needs of their activity level.

This is why it’s incredibly important to exercise in combination with a conscientious diet in order to both maximize weight loss and keep the weight off after you have reached your goal weight. It takes effort and exercise to convert white fat into brown fat, and dieting alone won’t accomplish that.

Is It Possible to Genetically Alter the Way That We Burn Fat?

Losing Weight and Keeping it Off

One of the authors of this study, Dr. Alexander Pfeifer, explains that there may be other mechanisms by which we can facilitate weight loss, using this knowledge of how brown and white fat work. He hypothesizes that if it were possible to “turn on” brown fat and increase its metabolism, or therapeutically convert white fat into brown fat, it would be possible to medically induce weight loss by inducing an “athletic” body fat state, even without exercise.

Of course, exercise would be an important part of any normal weight loss regimen, but by speeding up the body composition changes associated with exercise, or allowing those with limited mobility to benefit from increased brown fat, it would be possible to treat weight problems more quickly.

Some people, especially older people and people that are significantly overweight, could really benefit from this area of research because, they are the ones with the most issues engaging in healthy exercise. Dependent upon the safety of any medical treatment that facilitates these changes, they could become widely available to anyone in need of weight loss.

This is a relatively new field of research. Although scientists and health experts have long recognized that the human body houses both brown fat and white fat, it is only in recent years that they have recognized that the body has the ability to naturally convert stored white fat into active brown fat. It’s still years in the future, but current evidence suggests that we will one day have the capability to key into the body’s own conversion process and facilitate that change.

Adenosine and Caffeine Stimulate Metabolism in Brown Fat, but Not White Fat

Now, to the research at hand—Dr. Gnad and his associates have focused their efforts upon one particular receptor site in brown fat cells. This receptor is activated by Adenosine, and is referred to as A2A. Adenosine is a hormone that the body produces when it is under stress, to increase metabolism and and alertness. Most people are aware of an herbally derived analogue of Adenosine—Caffeine.

Many people use caffeine not only to increase alertness and ward off mental fogginess, but many people also use caffeine as a performance supplement. Caffeine increases metabolism and energy levels during exercise, and athletes, body builders, and fitness buffs often use caffeine before workouts to increase exercise capacity.

Even though bodybuilders have long used caffeine in their pre-exercise routines, we are still learning a lot of the mechanisms by which Adenosine and its analogues interact with the body. With regard to the A2A receptor, Adenosine facilitates increased fat-burning power.

Interestingly enough, white body fat does not have A2A Receptors, and this appears to be the primary reason why White Fat cells don’t burn energy nearly as fast as their brown counterparts. Dr. Gnad and his research associates performed animal research in which they introduced the A2A gene to White Body Fat Cells, and this led directly to increased metabolic activity in the White Fat. Essentially, the researchers proved that it is possible to directly convert white fat into brown fat simply by introducing these A2A Receptors to the cells.

There have been other studies which attempted similar results without success. Earlier studies monitored the impact of Adenosine upon hamsters and rats. In these mammals, Adenosine suppressed Brown Fat metabolism. Because of this, researchers hypothesized that the result would be the same in humans. Upon further study, however, it appears that rats and hamsters are designed differently, and that humans and mice respond in the opposite fashion to Adenosine, by stimulating metabolism.

This research is fascinating, and perhaps five or ten years down the road, this research will lead to real and amazing changes in our battle against weight loss. Of course, there are also other mechanisms by which this process can be stimulated. A2A is not the only means to stimulate brown fat metabolism that has been discovered.

Why Do Our Bodies Store White Fat So Readily?

Another study was released earlier this month in the academic journal, Cell, in which researchers discovered how to convince brains in mice to produce more brown fat and thereby increase metabolism. In this study, designed by representatives from Yale Medical School, researchers discovered that there is a hierarchy of “fears” which control how the brain optimizes metabolism. Two of the primary motivations which stimulate or suppress metabolism are the fear of freezing and the fear of starving. One reason why the body is so slow to convert white fat into brown fat is because the evolutionary mechanisms to prevent starvation are stronger than those to prevent freezing.

Of course, now that modern first world societies have effectively eradicated starvation for the vast majority of their populations, now it’s more important, at least in a first world context, to figure out ways to facilitate weight loss and increase brown fat in relationship to white fat.

Perhaps advances in stem cell research and hormone therapy will play a roll in this mechanism for weight loss. For now, there are steps you can take, like exercising regularly, which can increase the volume of brown fat, thereby increasing metabolism and improving weight loss gains. Perhaps in the near future, it will be possible to treat obesity as a disease, rather than as a lifestyle condition.

Doctor Mediated Weight Loss

The more that we learn about obesity, the more that it becomes clear that obesity is both a lifestyle issue and a disease, like many other conditions such as heart disease. By discovering new mechanisms to stimulate a healthier body composition while also encouraging individuals to make smarter lifestyle decisions, one day, Obesity may be a thing of the past.

DASH Diet Overview and Review

Posted: October 8, 2014 at 10:56 pm

The Dash Diet is a balanced diet, designed to get an individual all of the nutrients that they need in a conscientious diet, with an emphasis on maintaining a reasonable and responsible salt intake. The Dash Diet is similar to a number of other diets including the Mayo Clinic Diet, the Mediterranean Diet, the TLC Diet, and the Vegetarian Diet. Specifically, DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension.

The ultimate goal of the DASH diet is to alleviate or prevent hypertension, also known as high blood pressure. Hypertension is a dangerous circulatory state which significantly increases risks associated with heart and cardiovascular health.

The DASH Diet was developed in cooperation with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and its authors simultaneously claim that the diet can improve blood pressure while also making it easier to lose weight.

What is the Theory behind the DASH Diet?

The DASH Diet recognizes that there are certain nutrients that are vital to preserve healthy blood pressure, and builds a diet around responsibly providing the dieter with these nutrients. The four nutrients that are considered most important in promoting heart health are considered fiber, protein, calcium, and potassium.

Unlike many diets which encourage the dieter to keep track of nutrition and calorie counts regimen, this diet focuses primarily on moderation without excessive deliberation or calorie counting. These are the three aspects of the DASH Diet

Eat Foods That Encourage Hypertension Sparingly – The DASH Diet Recommends limiting the intake of Red Meat, Sweets, Processed Foods, and Calorie-Dense foods which provide little nutrition.

Eat Foods That Are Good For You and Your Heart – Foods such as lean meat, whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and low-fat dairy are encouraged. It’s important to note here that this is not a vegetarian diet.

Limit Salt Intake – Salt intake is strongly correlated with hypertension. Salt exacerbates existing high blood pressure, and may also contribute to the formation of such issues when used in excess.

You don’t have to track each one, though. Just emphasize the foods you’ve always been told to eat (fruits, veggies, whole grains, lean protein and low-fat dairy), while shunning those we’ve grown to love (calorie- and fat-laden sweets and red meat). Top it all off by cutting back on salt, and voilà!

The DASH Diet is an extensively researched diet plan, and there are two primary guides designed to show you how its done. Both are produced by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, one is short and to the point, and the other is more elaborate and gets into the science and specifics of the diet.

First, the DASH Diet takes into account your activity level as well as your age in order to provide you with a rough gauge of how many calories that you need to consume daily. Second, the guide for the diet provides an extensive list of foods, and which meet your nutritional needs most effectively. Third, the diet simply encourages you to limit sodium consumption.

The DASH Diet is not a complicated diet, which likely will attract many dieters looking for a no-nonsense diet plan. On the other hand, other dieters that are looking for more direct meal-to-meal guidance may prefer a different diet plan, even if it is close to the current diet.

How Can I Lose Weight with the DASH Diet?

In order to lose weight with the DASH Diet, simply take the caloric recommendations for your age and drop them down by 300-500 calories per day. This builds a caloric deficit into your nutritional recommendations, which will help you lose weight while simultaneously meeting your body’s nutritional needs.

Of course, in order to maximize the weight-loss benefits of this diet, you’ll benefit greatly from increasing your activity level with a combination of Anaerobic and Aerobic activity.

Does the DASH Diet Improve Cardiovascular Health?

There is powerful evidence that the DASH Diet succeeds greatly in reducing the severity of hypertension, and that it can also prevent high blood pressure in at-risk patients. Hypertension is associated with a wide variety of dangerous cardiovascular conditions, including stroke, heart failure, and heart disease.

By following this diet protocol, you can expect to improve your blood pressure while also promoting healthier cholesterol balance, with a reduction in LDL Cholesterol associated with poor health outcomes and an increase in HDL Cholesterol, which is associated with improved heart health. Also, the DASH Diet reduces triglycerides in the blood stream, which are strongly associated with heart disease.

The ultimate goal of the creators of the DASH Diet was to quantify what is generally accepted in the medical community to be a diet healthy for the heart, which is a diet low in salt, sugar, and saturated fat which is high in vegetables and nutrient-dense fruits.

Can the DASH Diet reduce the risk of Diabetes

There is resounding evidence that the DASH Diet is fantastic for patients that are at risk for diabetes. The specifics of the DASH Diet share a lot in common with recommendations offered by the American Diabetes Association. That means that this diet is simultaneously good for patients that want to avoid hypertension as well as diabetes, and when pursued in combination with dietary restriction and increased activity level, the diet can also produce significant weight loss benefits.

Are There Any Risks Associated with the DASH Diet?

There are no health issues associated with following this diet, although there is a chance that patients that suffer specific health conditions may need to alter the diet to meet their needs or protect their health. Before starting even the safest diet, discuss it with your doctor if you have any health issues which have any potential to conflict with your regimen.

How Does the DASH Diet Relate to Currently Agreed Upon Dietary Recommendations?

Salt – The DASH Diet recommends salt consumption less then 2,300 milligrams per day, although patients that have kidney disease, diabetes, or hypertension are recommended to intake no more than 1,500 milligrams per day, as well as all African Americans and men and women over the age of 50.

Fat – The DASH Diet is designed to reduce the amount of saturated fat you eat significantly, while keeping you in the 20-35% fat intake range that is ideal.

Protein – This diet focuses on lean meat, and provides plenty of protein to meet your daily needs.

Carbohydrates – It’s important to control both the amount of carbohydrates that you eat daily as well as their source. The DASH Diet strictly limits sweets and simple carbs, encouraging dieters to get their carbohydrates from more complex sources.

Vitamin B12 – The DASH Diet more than meets the minimum standards for this nutrient.

Calcium – As the DASH Diet places a premium upon cardiovascular health, it makes sense that the diet provides more than enough calcium to meet your daily needs.

Potassium – The DASH Diet is one of the only diets which successfully meet nutrition recommendations with regard to potassium. Ideally, you should be getting 4900 milligrams of potassium per day.

Fiber – Fiber is central to the success of the DASH diet, because the diet places a premium on satiety, and fiber is one of the best things that you can eat to feel full. Fiber also encourages healthy digestion.

Vitamin D – The DASH Diet includes no recommendations for Vitamin D, but it’s important to get at least 15 micrograms daily, whether through diet, sunlight, supplementation, or a combination of the three.

A Lighter Life

Posted: September 27, 2016 at 6:42 pm

Captain Nikon posted a photo:

A Lighter Life

I’m not normally one for putting self portraits on Flickr but i thought I would like to share my successful lifestyle change with my Flickr contacts…

At the end of March this year I was told that my blood pressure, bad cholesterol and blood sugar levels were all high and if I didn’t change my lifestyle I would have to be on tablets for the rest of my life…

so I decided to change and this is photographic proof, I have lost 6st in 6 months by changing my diet completely and exercising every day for at least 2hrs…
just a few lbs off target now.

Read more:
A Lighter Life

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in underwear, xxl woman on black background

Posted: September 27, 2016 at 6:42 pm

Alex Magic posted a photo:

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in underwear, xxl woman on black background

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in underwear, xxl woman on black background, full length portrait

See the original post:
Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in underwear, xxl woman on black background

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in blue dress outdoors, xxl woman on nature

Posted: September 27, 2016 at 6:42 pm

Alex Magic posted a photo:

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in blue dress outdoors, xxl woman on nature

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in blue dress outdoors, xxl woman on nature, full length portrait

Here is the original post:
Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in blue dress outdoors, xxl woman on nature

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model with big breast in black bra, xxl woman on dark background

Posted: September 27, 2016 at 6:42 pm

Alex Magic posted a photo:

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model with big breast in black bra, xxl woman on dark background

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model with big breast in black bra, xxl woman on dark background, professional makeup and hairstyle

Original post:
Young beautiful caucasian plus size model with big breast in black bra, xxl woman on dark background

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in swimsuit, xxl woman on black background

Posted: September 27, 2016 at 6:42 pm

Alex Magic posted a photo:

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in swimsuit, xxl woman on black background

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in swimsuit, xxl woman on black background, full length portrait

Go here to see the original:
Young beautiful caucasian plus size model in swimsuit, xxl woman on black background

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model with big breast in black bra licking a lollipop, xxl woman on dark background

Posted: September 27, 2016 at 6:42 pm

Alex Magic posted a photo:

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model with big breast in black bra licking a lollipop, xxl woman on dark background

Young beautiful caucasian plus size model with big breast in black bra licking a lollipop, xxl woman on dark background, professional makeup and hairstyle

Read this article:
Young beautiful caucasian plus size model with big breast in black bra licking a lollipop, xxl woman on dark background

All on Mobile

Posted: September 22, 2016 at 10:43 am

Kombizz posted a photo:

All on Mobile

More here:
All on Mobile

Absurdmerica: American grocery shoppers and their lifted 4×4 truck driven on asphalt

Posted: September 22, 2016 at 10:42 am

Capa_r2 posted a photo:

Absurdmerica: American grocery shoppers and their lifted 4x4 truck driven on asphalt

Visit link:
Absurdmerica: American grocery shoppers and their lifted 4×4 truck driven on asphalt

Virginia Weight and Wellness

Posted: September 22, 2016 at 10:42 am

At Virginia Weight and Wellness, we provide concierge style medical care providing realistic, practical, sustainable, affordable care to promote long term weight reduction and improvement in metabolic health. Only by spending extensive time with you and getting to know you, can we fully evaluate the long term obstacles to help us provide long term solutions for your long term success.

We understand the many complicated factors that contribute to weight gain,we recognize the impact of weight on one’s health and well-being, and we truly appreciate how difficult it is to lose weight. We take the time to fully listen to you to understand your needs and work with you personally todevelop a plan ofaction that is customized and tailored specifically to you.

At Virginia Weight and Wellness,we use a combination ofnutrition, exercise, education, motivation, medication, accountability, and continuous, compassionate support to help you achieve your goals for successful long term weight loss and overall improved health and well-being.

We invite you to browse through our website to learn more about usand we hope that wemaybe able to serve you in the future.

Sincerely,

Dr. Jeffrey Sicat, Kelly Steiner, Erin Poston, Courtney Harden, Heather Sedwick, andthe Staff of VirginiaWeight and Wellness__________________________________________________

A Special Thanks to Our Patients forNominating & AwardingDr. Sicat to

The 2013 Best Bedside Manner Awards

“Medical expertise & compassionate care should always go hand-in-hand when it comes to treating patients. Going to the doctor can be an unnerving experience for many people. Professionals who incorporateThe Golden Rule into their practice philosophy are ones that stand out in peoples minds for the better.

The 2013 Best Bedside Manner Awards, presented by OurHealth magazine, honors medical providers who were voted by the local community for kindness, empathy, and attentiveness – attributes that go a long way in gaining a patient’s confidence.

The Voting Process: During May and June 2013, commercials announcing the 2013 Best Bedside Manner Awards and how to submit votes for medical providers across nearly 60 specialties, aired on OurHealths television media partners station, CBS 6, WTVR-TV. Print ads were also included in OurHealths May 2013 magazine. Votes were submitted by the public through an online submission form June 1st – July 15th 2013, during which time nearly 10,000 votes were cast.” — Our Health Magazine 12/13

Dr. Sicat is board certified in the both the field of medical weight loss by theAmerican Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM) as well asEndocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism by the American Board of Internal Medicine Medical Specialties.

Dr. Sicat has a passion for teaching both patients and health care providers, whether one-on-one with his patients, to small groups,or to larger audiences.In addition to lecturing locally to businesses and organizations, he has been an invited speaker both regionally and nationally. Upcoming (or Recent) Regional and National Presentations where Dr. Sicat will be presenting to physicians: “American Board of Obesity Medicine Board Review Course- Physiology and Pathophysiology of Obesity” Invited presentation by the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP) / Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). San Francisco, CA. April 2016.

“Pathophysiology of Obesity – Part 1: Brain, Gut, and Adipocyte Hormones in Energy Regulation”Invited presentation by the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP) / Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Washington, DC. October 2015.

“Pathophysiology of Obesity – Part 2: Microbiome, Sleep, Body Fat Distribution, and Diabetes”Invited presentation by the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP) / Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Washington, DC. October 2015.

“American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM) Board Review Teaching”Invited presentation by the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP). Austin, Texas. October 2014.

Pharmacologic Management of Diabetes to Achieve Weight Loss and Medication Reduction Invited presentation by the American Board of Bariatric Medicine and the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP). Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.March 2014. Practical Approaches to Weight Loss with your Clinic Patients Invited presentation to Medicine Grand Rounds, McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center (McGuire VAMC). Richmond, Virginia.January 2014.

Thyroid Disorders and Obesity: The Link Between Thyroid Function and Weight Gain Invited presentation by the American Board of Bariatric Medicine and the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP). Phoenix, Arizona.October 2013.

Endocrinology Overview for the American Board of Obesity Medicine Examination Invited presentation by the American Board of Bariatric Medicine and the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP). Phoenix, Arizona.October 2013. Endocrinology Overview for the American Board of Obesity Medicine Examination Invited presentation by the American Board of Bariatric Medicine and the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP). San Diego, California. April 2013. The Affect of Non-Diet and Non-Exercise in Weight Loss Invited presentation by the Bon Secours Medical Group / VCU Medical Center physician CME program. Richmond, Virginia. March 2013 What to do When Diet and Exercise Don’t Work! Invited presentation by the Virginia Chapter of the American College of Physicians (ACP). Richmond, Virginia. March 2013. Obesity Medical Treatment Course Invited presentations by the Obesity Medicine Association, a division of the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP), co-presenting a one day seminar on training physicians about weight loss medicine. Richmond, Virginia. March 2013.

Thyroid Disease and Obesity – The Chicken or the Egg? Invited presentation at Endocrinology Grand Rounds at Virginia Commonwealth University to VCU Medical Center Endocrinology Faculty, Fellows, and Staff. Richmond, Virginia. November 2012.

Endocrinology Overview for the American Board of Obesity Medicine Examination Invited presentation by the American Board of Bariatric Medicine and the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP). Orlando, Florida. October 2012.

Practical PCOS for the Medical Bariatrician: What to Know about PCO Invited presentation by the American Board of Bariatric Medicine and the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP). Denver, Colorado. April 2012.

Endocrinology Overview for the American Board of Obesity Medicine Examination Invited presentation by the American Board of Bariatric Medicine and the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP). Denver, Colorado.April 2012. Practical Strategies for Weight Loss in your Primary Care Office! Invited presentation by the Virginia Chapter of the American College of Physicians (ACP). Charlottesville, Virginia. March 2012.

Original post:
Virginia Weight and Wellness

Zacharias Ganey Health Institute

Posted: September 22, 2016 at 10:42 am

When I came to ZG, I was overweight with high blood sugar & cholesterol. Dr. Madge and her team helped me turn all of that around. I’ve lost 45lbs, lowered my cholesterol and blood sugar and now I have more energy than ever before. All I have to say is “There’s no place like ZG.” – Lora M. I just graduated from my ZG Class and have to admit: I am loving this! Not only have I lost 40lbs, but I’m feeling better than ever! My friends at work are starting to notice, but I tell them…It’s not a diet, it’s a healthy lifestyle change program which I know I can follow the rest of my life…a better life. – Ryland P. Nothing in the past has worked. I knew how I wanted to look and feel but couldn’t get motivated to do it. My family and I decided to start ZG…and I lost 35lbs in 11 weeks. The trainers are amazing, passionate, encouraging and are willing to help however they can. I have not felt this good in a long time…it’s awesome! The information, motivation and excitement I have gained by joining ZG is priceless. – Kali E.

View original post here:
Zacharias Ganey Health Institute


Page 11234..1020..»