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Are dogs able to eat pumpkin? – Dog of the Day

Posted: August 27, 2021 at 1:44 am

VALLEY CENTER, CALIFORNIA - OCTOBER 10: General view of the atmosphere at Bates Nut Farm on October 10, 2020 in Valley Center, California. (Photo by Daniel Knighton/Getty Images)

Its officially the arrival of pumpkin spice season thanks to Starbucks, but we already know that this seasonal spice mix is not dog friendly. But what about actual pumpkin? Is that a dog safe treat?

As Fetch by WebMD explains, pumpkin is actually a doggy superfood. Not only does it help to soothe an upset stomach (in moderation), but it also helps to remove excess water in a dogs digestive tract. Dog owners can even use this product to help their pups when they have diarrhea.

Basically, pumpkin is magic when it comes to dogs and we love that. The thing about pumpkin, is that it can be added to your dogs regular meal as needed or it can be used as an ingredient in pet friendly dog treats. The fact that it is actually a pretty versatile product for our dogs is a great reason to keep in on hand.

Just because pumpkin is good and safe for your dog to eat, that doesnt mean that there are not some things to pay attention to as well. In fact, while this is good for our dogs, it can still cause problems if we give them too much.

This is a high calorie ingredient, which means it should never be more than 10 percent of your dogs diet. Its also important to remember that too much fiber can also be a bad thing, so we should always try to be careful when incorporating this into your pups meals or treats.

All this to say that it looks like our pups can join us in our Fall foodie extravaganzas. Or at the very least, they can get into the Autumnal spirit with their own pumpkin treats.

Yes, pumpkin is dog safe and also good for your dog. But just like anything, it is important to remember moderation is key. Just like with us, too much of a good thing can easily become a bad thing.

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Are dogs able to eat pumpkin? - Dog of the Day

Are COVID-19 vaccines safe and effective for people with COPD? – Medical News Today

Posted: August 27, 2021 at 1:44 am

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term for conditions that result in breathing difficulties. As it affects the lungs, it can increase the risk of severe complications from COVID-19. Therefore, it is advisable for those living with COPD to get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as possible.

COPD refers to a group of conditions that limit the functioning of the airways and causes trouble breathing. Evidence suggests that in 2018, more than 16 million people in the U.S. reported a diagnosis of COPD. As COVID-19 may lead to mild to severe respiratory problems, people with COPD are at a higher risk of more severe illness from COVID-19 due to their existing lung problems.

Evidence suggests that the COVID-19 vaccines available to those in America are safe and effective. Research also indicates that the vaccines are suitable and efficacious for people living with COPD.

In this article, we will discuss the safety and efficacy of the available COVID-19 vaccines for people living with COPD.

In general, it is advisable for everyone to receive a COVID-19 vaccination. According to the American Lung Association, people with lung disease, such as COPD, should get a COVID-19 vaccine.

While COPD itself is not a risk factor for acquiring a SARS-CoV-2 infection, existing lung damage due to COPD means people are more likely to experience severe complications of COVID-19. A 2021 article highlights that having COPD can increases a persons risk of hospitalization, ICU admission, and death from COVID-19.

As a result, it is highly advisable for people living with COPD to receive a vaccination as soon as it is feasible. The vaccines provide protection against the disease, due to an immune response to the SARS-Cov-2 virus. Developing immunity through vaccination reduces the risk of a person developing the illness and its potential consequences.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggest that the only people who should not receive a COVID-19 vaccine are those with a contraindication to it. This refers to a condition or circumstance, such as an allergy, that may act as a reason not to receive the vaccine due to the harm it could cause.

To further reduce risk, It is important that family members and friends also receive the vaccine and all people continue practices, such as hand washing, physical distancing, and wearing masks, to provide the most protection for those that are most vulnerable.

Vaccine efficacy refers to two things: how well the vaccine performs in ideal conditions and the percentage reduction in a disease in a group of people who received a vaccination in a clinical trial. Vaccine effectiveness is the measure of how well a vaccine works when given to people in the community outside of clinical trials. An efficacious and effective vaccine will help to reduce hospitalizations and death.

Currently, there is no data on the efficacy and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines specifically in people with COPD. However, all approved vaccines available to those in the U.S. have displayed promising levels of efficacy. A preprint 2021 study suggests that those who are fully vaccinated are three times less likely to have a SARS-CoV-2 infection.

All authorized vaccines in the U.S. undergo stringent protocols to ensure safety. Both the CDC and the American Thoracic Society indicate that COVID-19 vaccines are safe for people living with lung conditions such as COPD. As evidence suggests that people living with COPD are more likely to experience severe complications form COVID-19, it is advisable for them to get the vaccine to increase their protection against SARS-CoV-2.

In the United States, the three available COVID-19 vaccines are generally safe for most people. However, as with most vaccines, the COVID-19 vaccine may lead to side effects in anyone, including those living with COPD. It is unclear whether a person living with COPD is more likely than those without the condition to experience side effects from the vaccine. Some possible side effects may include:

Currently, in the U.S., the following vaccines are available under emergency use authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration:

There is no evidence to suggest that one vaccine is necessarily superior to the others, so health experts recommend getting any of the vaccines available, as they all provide protection against COVID-19. Individuals getting either the Pfizer vaccine or the Moderna may not mix vaccines. Both shots must be the same vaccine.

In August 2021, the CDC announced that the protection of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines may decrease over time. Starting in mid-September, the CDC recommends a 3rd booster shot starting 8 months after a persons second shot. Experts think that a booster shot for people that took the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is also likely.

Receiving the COVID-19 vaccine will not interfere with COPD treatments. Typically, COPD treatment may include breathing techniques, oxygen therapy, and medication to relax the airways and reduce swelling. Taking any of the available COVID-19 vaccines is unlikely to affect a persons treatment plan.

Since people with COPD are at an increased risk for developing complications from respiratory infections, getting additional vaccines is vital. The CDC recommends people with COPD get certain vaccines to decrease their risk of increased respiratory symptoms and complications. The CDC advise that people with COPD receive the following vaccines:

A persons doctor may also recommend additional vaccines depending on a persons lifestyle, age, and underlying conditions. A person can use this tool to see what other vaccines they may require.

It is important to contact a doctor if vaccine side effects continue for more than a few days. Usually, vaccine side effects may only last 12 days. If side effects get worse after a day or 2, it is also advisable to see a doctor.

If signs of a serious allergic reaction occur after getting the vaccine, people should seek emergency medical attention. Signs of an allergic reaction can include:

Individuals living with COPD are at a higher risk of severe complications of COVID-19, which makes them a higher priority for receiving the vaccine. Evidence suggests that the available vaccines are safe and effective for people with COPD. As a result, health experts recommend that people living with COPD should get their COVID-19 vaccination as soon as it is available to them.

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Are COVID-19 vaccines safe and effective for people with COPD? - Medical News Today

Both species of bears eating berries right now on Moose-Wilson Road (so it’s closed) – Jackson Hole News&Guide

Posted: August 27, 2021 at 1:44 am

Berries are ripening and bears are gorging on the nutritious little fruit right now along narrow, winding Moose-Wilson Road, where a close encounter would be potentially dangerous.

And as a result, the northern stretch of the Grand Teton National Park road is closed until further notice. Specifically, all visitors are prohibited from traveling the portion of Moose-Wilson Road between the Murie Ranch junction and Death Canyon junction.

Grizzly 399 and her four cubs plus "several" additional black bears are using the area, Teton Park spokesman C.J. Adams said.

The road is closed for human safety and the protection of the bears, Teton Park officials announced in a press release. Because of its narrow surface lined with dense vegetation, hillsides, and wetlands, the Moose-Wilson Road does not allow for a safe distance between people and bears.

The Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve can be accessed from the south, by coming through Teton Village. But the Death Canyon Road and parking area are currently off limits.

Park staff are monitoring the bears whereabouts and will reopen the road when they believe it is safe.

"When we do these closures, they typically remain for about 72 hours," Adams said. "And then we reevaluate."

Moose-Wilson Road closes due to bear activity with some regularity, oftentimes as a result of grizzly bears along the corridor.

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Both species of bears eating berries right now on Moose-Wilson Road (so it's closed) - Jackson Hole News&Guide

Pause and reassess: What activities are safe during the delta surge? – WCNC.com

Posted: August 27, 2021 at 1:44 am

A Novant Health doctor gives her recommendations on how to best protect yourself while out and about as delta spreads rapidly.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. COVID-19 cases are surging right now, because of the much more contagious delta variant. This comes after a few promising months, where restrictions were loosened, and many people thought life was largely returning to the way it was.

Thats now changed, so what activities are still safe? WCNC Charlotte asked Novant Health Internal Medicine Specialist Dr. Yvette Rudisel.

I can tell you what Im recommending to my patients, to my family, and my friends," Dr. Rudisel said. "I'm asking them to take a reset, to take a pause and to reassess."

Outdoor activities can be safer and are a good option to take whenever possible.

Many people have returned to dining out in restaurants, and since social distancing is not required by state or county mandate right now, outdoor seating is something to consider.

I would also elect that if you are going to eat out -- if eating outside is an option, choose that option, Rudisel said.

Sometimes indoor activities are unavoidable. If working out inside, Rudisel suggests wiping down equipment before and after use, avoiding machines directly next to someone else, and of course, wearing a mask.

At all locations, assess the situation to figure out whats safe. At places like a movie theater, salon, or grocery store, go at a time when it's less crowded and social distance whenever possible.

I think that any kind of crowded, enclosed space that you can't assess the ventilation is something you should be cautious about, she said.

People who are required to be in the office or cannot work from home should keep masks on unless alone in a room.

Rudisel says these are simple precautions to keep the past from repeating itself.

Nobody wants to close down but I think we're all concerned that if we don't do better, that it could happen," Rudisel said. "We dont want that. We want the kids in school, we want to keep having our activities."

She added that getting vaccinated is the best way to make going out in public again safe, and it has an impact on the entire community. The more people vaccinated, the less opportunity the virus has to mutate and spread.

Contact Chloe Leshner atcleshner@wcnc.comand follow her onFacebook,TwitterandInstagram.

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Pause and reassess: What activities are safe during the delta surge? - WCNC.com

Health Benefits of Lutein and Top Food Sources – Healthline

Posted: August 27, 2021 at 1:44 am

Lutein is a type of carotenoid that has antioxidant properties and can provide various health benefits.

The most researched benefit of lutein is related to eye health, but it has also been linked to heart health, improved cognitive function, and reduced risk of certain types of cancer.

This article explores everything you need to know about lutein, including food sources of it, supplements, health benefits, and potential risks.

Lutein is a xanthophyll, or an oxygen-containing carotenoid. Carotenoids are responsible for the naturally occurring yellow, orange, and red pigments found in foods. They are considered an essential nutrient since our bodies cant make them, we must get them through food (1).

There are two types of carotenoids. Xanthophylls, which contain oxygen and usually contribute to yellow pigments, and carotenes, which dont contain oxygen and tend to contribute to orange pigments.

Lutein is found in the retina of the eye, along with another xanthophyll, zeaxanthin. Because these carotenoids are found concentrated in the back of the eye, they are known as macular pigments and may be beneficial for eye health (1).

Lutein has antioxidant properties that may also play a role in cognitive function, heart health, and the prevention of some cancers, though more studies are needed (1).

The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) is an often-cited study on lutein and eye health. Researchers looked at specific formulations of supplements and their impact on age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

A supplement containing lutein and zeaxanthin reduced the occurrence of advanced AMD by 25% over 5 years in people who already had AMD. In people without AMD, the supplement did not prevent or treat the condition (2).

Beta carotene, another carotenoid linked to eye health, was originally used in the supplement but was found to increase the risk of lung cancer in people who smoke.

Swapping out beta carotene for lutein and zeaxanthin was just as beneficial for eye health and did not increase lung cancer risk (2, 3).

Another eye-health plus for lutein is that its an antioxidant. Inflammation and oxidative stress are related to eye conditions such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and macular degeneration.

Lutein has antioxidant properties, and studies have found it to be significantly effective in the prevention of these eye conditions (4, 5, 6).

Additionally, research suggests that lutein is important for babies eye development during pregnancy and for vision throughout their lifespan, though more research is needed to determine the optimal dose for pregnant and breastfeeding women (7).

Lastly, lutein may be an effective treatment for dry eyes, though more studies in this area are needed (8).

High dietary intakes of lutein, as well as high levels of circulating lutein, have been associated with better heart health (9).

One study associated lutein and zeaxanthin with improvements in clinical markers in patients with heart disease. Researchers believe the anti-inflammatory properties were beneficial and suggest continued research in this area (10).

Another study found that daily supplementation of 20 mg of lutein for 3 months was associated with a decrease in cholesterol and triglyceride levels, both of which are known risk factors for heart disease (11).

However, research on lutein and heart health is mixed overall, and some studies have found no correlation at all. More research, specifically in humans, is needed to determine luteins role in heart health (3, 12).

Lutein, along with other carotenoids, may improve cancer prognosis (13).

One study found that a high intake of lutein, along with other nutrients found in fruits and vegetables, was associated with a decreased risk of pancreatic cancer (14).

Additionally, lutein, along with other carotenoids, may be protective against breast cancer as well as head and neck cancer (15, 16, 17).

Overall, research on lutein and its benefits relating to cancer is promising but not definitive, and more human studies are needed (18).

Research indicates that a high dietary intake and high circulating levels of lutein are associated with both better cognitive performance and enhanced memory (19, 20, 21).

One study found that a daily supplement including 10 mg of lutein along with zeaxanthin and meso-zeaxanthin was effective in improving memory over the course of 1 year (22).

Carotenoids overall may play a protective role in preventing neurodegenerative diseases, too, meaning they may help promote brain health in older age, though the research is still mixed (3, 23).

Lutein is generally found in dark, leafy green vegetables and yellow-pigmented foods. Because its a fat-soluble nutrient, you need to consume some fat to absorb the lutein you eat.

Some lutein-rich food sources are (6):

Because lutein is fat-soluble, your body will absorb it best when you eat it with other foods, particularly foods containing fat. However, if you prefer, lutein is available in supplement form, often in conjunction with zeaxanthin or as a part of the AREDS-2 formulation for eye health.

A typical diet contains 13 mg of lutein per day, but most benefits have been shown at 6 mg per day, which can be achieved through consuming food sources of lutein (6).

Most supplements contain 20 mg or more, which is much higher than the amount needed to get the benefits of lutein. However, most studies on lutein have used doses from 1040 mg per day and have not found any adverse effects (5).

Lutein is categorized as Generally Regarded as Safe (GRAS), meaning that research has not found a significant link between regular lutein consumption and adverse side effects.

However, high intakes of xanthophylls, in general, have been linked to an increased risk of skin and stomach cancers.

While results from these studies were not found to be significant, more research is needed to confirm safe and optimal doses of xanthophylls such as lutein (5, 24, 25).

Before adding lutein supplements to your diet, its a good idea to talk with your doctor.

Lutein is a type of carotenoid with strong antioxidant properties that have been shown to be beneficial for eye health, cognitive function, and heart health and may even help decrease the risk of some cancers.

However, while some of the research is promising, most if it is not definitive and more studies are needed to confirm some of these benefits.

Foods such as dark, leafy greens and egg yolks are great sources of lutein. While you can find lutein in supplement form, it is possible to consume enough lutein through diet alone.

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Health Benefits of Lutein and Top Food Sources - Healthline

Plans for a Safe School Year – Government of Nova Scotia

Posted: August 27, 2021 at 1:44 am

Students return to school on Sept. 7 with core public health measures in place and a return to a more familiar routine.

Nova Scotias Back to School Plan requires a commitment to vaccination and staying home if unwell, as well as ongoing hand sanitization, use of masks and continued cleaning of high-touch surfaces.Additional public health measures will be introduced if COVID-19 case numbers rise.

As the school year begins, masks are required at all times for anyone inside a school building or bus. They can be removed when the person is eating and drinking, participating in physical activity, and for breaks where people are physically distanced. As the province enters Phase 5 of its reopening plan, schools will transition to masks being optional.

Our schools are as safe as our communities and thanks to safe and effective vaccines, and Nova Scotians rolling up their sleeves, our schools have an additional layer of protection this year that will allow students to have a much more normal year, said Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotias chief medical officer of health. We continue to have core public health measures in place to protect everyone in our schools, including wearing masks, frequent hand washing, staying home if youre sick and sanitizing high-touch surfaces.

In September, students, families and staff can expect:

If enhanced public health measures are required and students move to at-home learning, learning from home will look similar to the approach used in 2020-21.

Like last year, the plan for the 2021-2022 school year was created with significant input direction and guidance from public health officials, advice from Provincial Paediatric Advisory Group, feedback from the Nova Scotia Teachers Union (NSTU) and support unions, the Public School Administrators Association of Nova Scotia (PSAANS), support staff and teachers, survey results from parents and guardians, and recommendations from other key partners.

This pandemic has illustrated the importance of keeping our children and youth in school, where they have access to supports and programs that benefit their learning, as well as their social, physical and mental well-being. Thanks to our parents, students and dedicated teachers and administrators, Nova Scotias education system has fared well through COVID-19. Im confident this plan with its appropriate guidance around masking -- supports a safe return to class. Our Provincial Pediatric Advisory Group continues to be engaged with public health and education partners to ensure our schools remain safe spaces for our children to learn, develop and grow.Dr. Andrew Lynk, chief of pediatrics, IWK Health Centre, chair of pediatrics Dalhousie University, president of the Pediatric Chairs of Canada

Nova Scotias Back to School Plan includes a layered approach to infection prevention and control getting vaccinated, staying home when you are sick, washing your hands often and wearing a mask when appropriate are all actions staff and students can take do. Additionally, regional centres for education and Conseil scolaire acadien provincial are ensuring that high-touch surfaces are cleaned often and ventilation systems are working as designed. Schools have not been a significant source of infection transmission and Im confident the plan for this year has appropriate measures that will continue to keep students and staff safe.Dr. Jeannette Comeau, paediatric infectious diseases physician and medical director, Infection Prevention & Control, IWK Health

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Plans for a Safe School Year - Government of Nova Scotia

Here’s how kids can stay safe this school year during the delta variant surge – WBAL Baltimore

Posted: August 27, 2021 at 1:44 am

Millions of students are heading back to school with a challenge they didn't have to face last year.The more contagious delta variant is fueling a nationwide COVID-19 surge that's sending younger people to hospitals including children. The best weapon for students ages 12 and up is vaccination, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. But kids too young to get vaccinated also have ways to help dodge delta.Here's how students can help stay healthy before, during and after school:Going to schoolBefore heading out: Minor symptoms that may have been overlooked in the past such as a runny nose shouldn't be ignored now, said pediatrician Dr. Steven Abelowitz, regional medical director of Coastal Kids Pediatrics in California."With the current rise in COVID cases, especially in children, it is advised that parents of children even with minor symptoms should contact their pediatrician to rule out COVID," Abelowitz said, matching guidance from the CDC.Of course, some kids can get or spread the delta variant without symptoms. So precautions during other parts of the day are important.At the bus stop: When chatting with a friend outdoors, "the risk of acquiring coronavirus is very low," CNN medical analyst and emergency physician Dr. Leana Wen said."Therefore, waiting at the bus stop or recess or coming out of the school, masks can be taken off."But if there are many children crowded together, "even though it's outdoors, if you're unvaccinated ... the advantages of masks are going to outweigh the disadvantages," Abelowitz said.On the school bus: "Mask wearing is absolutely critical because you're in close proximity in an enclosed space," Wen said."Make sure to be wearing a mask that covers your nose and your mouth. It should be at least the quality of a 3-ply surgical mask," she said."There are also KN95s, depending on the age of the child, that are even better. But the mask should be at least a 3-ply surgical mask. A cloth mask is not sufficient."Research has shown properly worn surgical masks generally give more protection than a cloth mask. If a cloth mask is used, the CDC said it should have multiple layers.When carpooling with another family: Carpooling might be safer if you're in a "pandemic pod" with another family.In that situation, "all adults should be vaccinated, the adults should be trying to reduce risk in their lives as much as both parties agree to, and essentially, you're in a household with that family," Wen said."If you are not in a pandemic pod with someone and you're still carpooling, everybody in that carpool should be wearing masks. Windows should be rolled down," she said. "It's not zero risk, but that also reduces the risk substantially."In the classroom and hallwaysThe importance of masks this year: The CDC recommends students from kindergarten through grade 12 wear masks in school as the highly contagious delta variant spreads nationwide.The American Academy of Pediatrics now recommends masks in schools for everyone over age 2.The delta variant has been a game changer, Abelowitz said.New pediatric COVID-19 cases are "significantly higher than a few months ago and climbing quite rapidly," he said."We do know that masks reduce the chance of spread. We do know that there's a significant increase in the delta variant," Abelowitz said."If these numbers are not controlled, eventually, unfortunately, the kids are not going to be in-person schooling."Get masks that kids actually like: There's no point in wearing a mask if a child keeps tugging at it or taking it off in school."This is something that does take getting used to," Wen said. "It may be good to practice wearing the mask at home and making sure that you're OK with that type of mask."Wen said her own son had to adjust to wearing a mask. But after "a couple of days into school ... it felt like second nature.""I think it's worth trying, if you can, different types of masks," she said. "Different people have different comfort levels."Some students might like one brand of well-fitting surgical masks over another. Other kids might feel more comfortable wearing child-sized KN95 masks, which allow more room for the nose and mouth."The most important thing is to find the best that you can consistently wear throughout the day," Wen said. "You don't want to find a mask that you're trying to pull off your face every 20 minutes."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Explaining masks to young kids: It can be tough explaining the importance of wearing masks in school to a young child. But it's not necessary to go into too much detail, Abelowitz said.For a 6-year-old, "You could simplify it as: 'There are people out there that are getting sick from other people. By wearing a mask, you will reduce the chance of you getting sick, and also reduce the chance of other people around you getting sick,'" Abelowitz said."'So that's why it's not only important for you to wear the mask to protect yourself, but it also can help protect other people.'"Another perk for young children: By wearing a mask and not getting sick, kids will be able to keep seeing their friends at school, Abelowitz said.Dealing with potential bulliesSome students might get bullied for wearing a mask. So it's important for children to be confident and prepared for such scenarios, psychologist Dr. Sanam Hafeez said."Parents need to instill in their children that they are doing the right thing by protecting their own health and the health of others around them," said Hafeez, director of Comprehensive Consultation Psychological Services in New York."They need to boost the child's confidence so they don't feel like they have to 'ditch' the mask to fit in or make the bullying stop. The more confident that the child is with the decision to wear a mask, the easier it will be for him/her to stand their ground."Parents can also help prevent such bullying in the first place."There is an old saying, 'children learn what they live.' A child who bullies over face mask-wearing has most likely learned that behavior from his/her parents," Hafeez said.If such bullying does happen, a child's response might depend on the age."For younger children, such as grade school, the simpler the answer the better," Hafeez said."Something like, 'I am being considerate by wearing a mask because I am protecting you from getting COVID. If you wore a mask you would protect others too.' Advise the child to say that and walk away and not engage with the bully," Hafeez said.If the bully becomes aggressive, the child should seek the help of a teacher.On the flip side, some students might get bullied for not wearing a mask for example, if their parents don't want them to."This is a tough situation for a child to be in. They might face words like "selfish," "germ spreader," "COVID Creep" or any number of insults kids might hurl at them," Hafeez said."If a child is in this situation and they do want to wear a mask, they should speak with their parents about doing so and explain how the bullying is making them feel and share what they might have learned about COVID prevention through mask wearing," she said."If a parent has forbidden a child under 18 to wear a mask, the student can say that he/she would like to wear a mask, but that is not the choice his/her parents have made for them."Wen said children have an opportunity to flex their maturity if they get bullied over wearing a mask.For example, they could say: "I wear a mask because of my grandmother. I don't want my grandmother to become ill. And I am doing this to protect people that I love."Returning to recessIf recess is outside and the school doesn't require masks outdoors, "I don't think that masks are (necessary) during recess," Wen said.That doesn't mean a student can't get infected outdoors. "At this point, there is no such thing as zero risk," Wen said. But "I would rather focus the mask wearing on indoor situations that are much higher risk."In areas with high COVID-19 numbers and when children are too young to be vaccinated "encouraging more distanced kind of games, even in outdoor settings, may be beneficial in mitigating" the delta variant, Abelowitz said.Both Wen and Abelowitz said it's a good for students to enjoy mask-free breaks outside."If they're outdoors, and they can maintain some distancing, and it's not that there's a major outbreak in a specific community, we prefer that they would be without masks," Abelowitz said.Enjoying lunch safely with friendsIt's impossible to wear masks while eating. And after a year of remote or hybrid learning, some cafeterias may be back to full capacity."I am worried about lunchtime. That is a high-risk setting, depending on how this is set up," Wen said."The best setup, obviously, would be outside. But if it's going to be inside, there should at least be excellent ventilation, some degree of spacing, and the kids should all be facing in the same direction instead of ... facing one another."But once students are done eating, they can put their masks on and chat face-to-face, Wen said.Some schools have allowed students to take their lunch to their classroom desks to help minimize crowds."Eating in socially distanced classrooms is certainly better than in a lunch hall with hundreds of other children in a small, enclosed indoor space," Wen said.One way students can socialize with different groups of friends is to eat outside, if the school allows it, Wen said. That could be in a courtyard, on the grass, or even a designated portion of the parking lot.Getting back to after-school funEven the best precautions during school can be nullified if kids get COVID-19 during after-school activities. And some students might let their guard down after school, Wen said."Remember that informal settings can have just as much if not more risk than formal settings," Wen said."I think so many people are worried about what happens when we're actually playing the sport and not thinking about wait, what about in the locker room?" she said."If kids are getting together in the locker room, spending time together, no masks on, that's a much higher risk setting that being outdoors playing a sport."The CDC warned about outbreaks connected to extracurricular activities last school year.And that was months before the delta variant the most contagious strain of novel coronavirus to hit the U.S. took over as the dominant strain.Those who were infected last year might not be fully protected from the delta variant this year especially those who are not vaccinated, Abelowitz said."We've seen that ... based on the Alpha variant or the variant prior, you have folks that have been infected with COVID can be infected again," the pediatrician said. "So we know for sure that you can be infected again, especially because there are different variants."Abelowitz said children should get vaccinated as soon as they're eligible.In the meantime, "close-contact sports, indoor sports are considered to be risky," Abelowitz said. The risk is amplified in areas of high COVID-19 numbers and low vaccination rates.Activities such as choir and band when students propel their breath into the air can also be high-risk, Abelowitz said.But that doesn't mean such activities and indoor sports need to be sidelined. Abelowitz and Wen said schools can consider regular COVID-19 testing for students in higher-risk activities.And whenever possible, after-school practices should be held outside, Wen said.If COVID-19 numbers are high in a community and not many children are vaccinated, a school may want to consider pausing higher-risk activities until the situation improves, Abelowitz said.All these safety precautions might seem daunting to some children. So it's important to emphasize what children can do now not what they can't do as they return to in-person learning, Wen said."It becomes more empowering to be able to say, 'Here is what you can do at school, including playing outdoors ... including being part of sports again,'" she said."We should be empowering and talk about what the child can do that's fun and what are the things that the child can do to reduce risk for them and for others around them."

Millions of students are heading back to school with a challenge they didn't have to face last year.

The more contagious delta variant is fueling a nationwide COVID-19 surge that's sending younger people to hospitals including children.

The best weapon for students ages 12 and up is vaccination, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. But kids too young to get vaccinated also have ways to help dodge delta.

Here's how students can help stay healthy before, during and after school:

Before heading out: Minor symptoms that may have been overlooked in the past such as a runny nose shouldn't be ignored now, said pediatrician Dr. Steven Abelowitz, regional medical director of Coastal Kids Pediatrics in California.

"With the current rise in COVID cases, especially in children, it is advised that parents of children even with minor symptoms should contact their pediatrician to rule out COVID," Abelowitz said, matching guidance from the CDC.

Of course, some kids can get or spread the delta variant without symptoms. So precautions during other parts of the day are important.

At the bus stop: When chatting with a friend outdoors, "the risk of acquiring coronavirus is very low," CNN medical analyst and emergency physician Dr. Leana Wen said.

"Therefore, waiting at the bus stop or recess or coming out of the school, masks can be taken off."

But if there are many children crowded together, "even though it's outdoors, if you're unvaccinated ... the advantages of masks are going to outweigh the disadvantages," Abelowitz said.

On the school bus: "Mask wearing is absolutely critical because you're in close proximity in an enclosed space," Wen said.

"Make sure to be wearing a mask that covers your nose and your mouth. It should be at least the quality of a 3-ply surgical mask," she said.

"There are also KN95s, depending on the age of the child, that are even better. But the mask should be at least a 3-ply surgical mask. A cloth mask is not sufficient."

Research has shown properly worn surgical masks generally give more protection than a cloth mask. If a cloth mask is used, the CDC said it should have multiple layers.

When carpooling with another family: Carpooling might be safer if you're in a "pandemic pod" with another family.

In that situation, "all adults should be vaccinated, the adults should be trying to reduce risk in their lives as much as both parties agree to, and essentially, you're in a household with that family," Wen said.

"If you are not in a pandemic pod with someone and you're still carpooling, everybody in that carpool should be wearing masks. Windows should be rolled down," she said. "It's not zero risk, but that also reduces the risk substantially."

The importance of masks this year: The CDC recommends students from kindergarten through grade 12 wear masks in school as the highly contagious delta variant spreads nationwide.

The American Academy of Pediatrics now recommends masks in schools for everyone over age 2.

The delta variant has been a game changer, Abelowitz said.

New pediatric COVID-19 cases are "significantly higher than a few months ago and climbing quite rapidly," he said.

"We do know that masks reduce the chance of spread. We do know that there's a significant increase in the delta variant," Abelowitz said.

"If these numbers are not controlled, eventually, unfortunately, the kids are not going to be in-person schooling."

Get masks that kids actually like: There's no point in wearing a mask if a child keeps tugging at it or taking it off in school.

"This is something that does take getting used to," Wen said. "It may be good to practice wearing the mask at home and making sure that you're OK with that type of mask."

Wen said her own son had to adjust to wearing a mask. But after "a couple of days into school ... it felt like second nature."

"I think it's worth trying, if you can, different types of masks," she said. "Different people have different comfort levels."

Some students might like one brand of well-fitting surgical masks over another. Other kids might feel more comfortable wearing child-sized KN95 masks, which allow more room for the nose and mouth.

"The most important thing is to find the best that you can consistently wear throughout the day," Wen said. "You don't want to find a mask that you're trying to pull off your face every 20 minutes."

Explaining masks to young kids: It can be tough explaining the importance of wearing masks in school to a young child. But it's not necessary to go into too much detail, Abelowitz said.

For a 6-year-old, "You could simplify it as: 'There are people out there that are getting sick from other people. By wearing a mask, you will reduce the chance of you getting sick, and also reduce the chance of other people around you getting sick,'" Abelowitz said.

"'So that's why it's not only important for you to wear the mask to protect yourself, but it also can help protect other people.'"

Another perk for young children: By wearing a mask and not getting sick, kids will be able to keep seeing their friends at school, Abelowitz said.

Some students might get bullied for wearing a mask. So it's important for children to be confident and prepared for such scenarios, psychologist Dr. Sanam Hafeez said.

"Parents need to instill in their children that they are doing the right thing by protecting their own health and the health of others around them," said Hafeez, director of Comprehensive Consultation Psychological Services in New York.

"They need to boost the child's confidence so they don't feel like they have to 'ditch' the mask to fit in or make the bullying stop. The more confident that the child is with the decision to wear a mask, the easier it will be for him/her to stand their ground."

Parents can also help prevent such bullying in the first place.

"There is an old saying, 'children learn what they live.' A child who bullies over face mask-wearing has most likely learned that behavior from his/her parents," Hafeez said.

If such bullying does happen, a child's response might depend on the age.

"For younger children, such as grade school, the simpler the answer the better," Hafeez said.

"Something like, 'I am being considerate by wearing a mask because I am protecting you from getting COVID. If you wore a mask you would protect others too.' Advise the child to say that and walk away and not engage with the bully," Hafeez said.

If the bully becomes aggressive, the child should seek the help of a teacher.

On the flip side, some students might get bullied for not wearing a mask for example, if their parents don't want them to.

"This is a tough situation for a child to be in. They might face words like "selfish," "germ spreader," "COVID Creep" or any number of insults kids might hurl at them," Hafeez said.

"If a child is in this situation and they do want to wear a mask, they should speak with their parents about doing so and explain how the bullying is making them feel and share what they might have learned about COVID prevention through mask wearing," she said.

"If a parent has forbidden a child under 18 to wear a mask, the student can say that he/she would like to wear a mask, but that is not the choice his/her parents have made for them."

Wen said children have an opportunity to flex their maturity if they get bullied over wearing a mask.

For example, they could say: "I wear a mask because of my grandmother. I don't want my grandmother to become ill. And I am doing this to protect people that I love."

If recess is outside and the school doesn't require masks outdoors, "I don't think that masks are (necessary) during recess," Wen said.

That doesn't mean a student can't get infected outdoors. "At this point, there is no such thing as zero risk," Wen said. But "I would rather focus the mask wearing on indoor situations that are much higher risk."

In areas with high COVID-19 numbers and when children are too young to be vaccinated "encouraging more distanced kind of games, even in outdoor settings, may be beneficial in mitigating" the delta variant, Abelowitz said.

Both Wen and Abelowitz said it's a good for students to enjoy mask-free breaks outside.

"If they're outdoors, and they can maintain some distancing, and it's not that there's a major outbreak in a specific community, we prefer that they would be without masks," Abelowitz said.

It's impossible to wear masks while eating. And after a year of remote or hybrid learning, some cafeterias may be back to full capacity.

"I am worried about lunchtime. That is a high-risk setting, depending on how this is set up," Wen said.

"The best setup, obviously, would be outside. But if it's going to be inside, there should at least be excellent ventilation, some degree of spacing, and the kids should all be facing in the same direction instead of ... facing one another."

But once students are done eating, they can put their masks on and chat face-to-face, Wen said.

Some schools have allowed students to take their lunch to their classroom desks to help minimize crowds.

"Eating in socially distanced classrooms is certainly better than in a lunch hall with hundreds of other children in a small, enclosed indoor space," Wen said.

One way students can socialize with different groups of friends is to eat outside, if the school allows it, Wen said. That could be in a courtyard, on the grass, or even a designated portion of the parking lot.

Even the best precautions during school can be nullified if kids get COVID-19 during after-school activities. And some students might let their guard down after school, Wen said.

"Remember that informal settings can have just as much if not more risk than formal settings," Wen said.

"I think so many people are worried about what happens when we're actually playing the sport and not thinking about wait, what about in the locker room?" she said.

"If kids are getting together in the locker room, spending time together, no masks on, that's a much higher risk setting that being outdoors playing a sport."

The CDC warned about outbreaks connected to extracurricular activities last school year.

And that was months before the delta variant the most contagious strain of novel coronavirus to hit the U.S. took over as the dominant strain.

Those who were infected last year might not be fully protected from the delta variant this year especially those who are not vaccinated, Abelowitz said.

"We've seen that ... based on the Alpha variant or the variant prior, you have folks that have been infected with COVID can be infected again," the pediatrician said. "So we know for sure that you can be infected again, especially because there are different variants."

Abelowitz said children should get vaccinated as soon as they're eligible.

In the meantime, "close-contact sports, indoor sports are considered to be risky," Abelowitz said. The risk is amplified in areas of high COVID-19 numbers and low vaccination rates.

Activities such as choir and band when students propel their breath into the air can also be high-risk, Abelowitz said.

But that doesn't mean such activities and indoor sports need to be sidelined. Abelowitz and Wen said schools can consider regular COVID-19 testing for students in higher-risk activities.

And whenever possible, after-school practices should be held outside, Wen said.

If COVID-19 numbers are high in a community and not many children are vaccinated, a school may want to consider pausing higher-risk activities until the situation improves, Abelowitz said.

All these safety precautions might seem daunting to some children. So it's important to emphasize what children can do now not what they can't do as they return to in-person learning, Wen said.

"It becomes more empowering to be able to say, 'Here is what you can do at school, including playing outdoors ... including being part of sports again,'" she said.

"We should be empowering and talk about what the child can do that's fun and what are the things that the child can do to reduce risk for them and for others around them."

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Here's how kids can stay safe this school year during the delta variant surge - WBAL Baltimore

What Parents Need to Know About Kids and Heat Waves – Outside

Posted: August 27, 2021 at 1:44 am

This summer has been a scorcher. According to a major United Nations climate report released earlier this month, the planets temperatures have reached record highs, and the extreme heat that many Americans experienced this summer will only become more common in the future. The heat has had devastating effects on people of all ages, but the smallest among us are especially vulnerable.

But simply keeping your kids inside isnt the answer, says Dr. Samuel Schimelpfenig, a pediatrician in Sioux Falls, South Dakota with a specialty in sports medicine for kids and adolescents. We are healthier physically and mentally if were outside in nature, he says. If we keep kids inside, we dont have to worry about heat illness quite so much, but the downside is theyre not being physically active and theyre probably spending too much time on a screen.

If your kid is going to be playing in the heat, heres what you need to know:

While on most days the body does a great job of regulating its own temperature (thanks to a region of the brain called the hypothalamus gland), extreme heat can overwhelm that function, disrupting the normal process that results in the evaporation of sweat from the skin. That overheating can lead to heatstroke, which usually includes at least one of three telltale signs: unconsciousness, fever, and a lack of sweat, Schimelpfenig says.

Little kidsand their smaller bodiesare more at risk than adults. They absorb heat from the environment much quicker than we do, explains Schimelpfenig. Its the difference between cooking a single chicken breast or roasting an entire turkey. The bigger turkey will likely need three or four hours in the oven, while a chicken breast might be done in less than 30 minutes. This may be especially true for young athleteswith certain disabilities or medical diagnoses that might make them more susceptible to heat conditions, along with those taking certain medications that increase heat sensitivity.

Parents, coaches, and caregivers should learn to recognize and treat milder heat illness symptoms quickly. Something as simple as bringing a child inside, offering them a cold drink, and having them rest can make a difference. Missing the early signs could result in something much more dangerous. There are kids that end up in the emergency room dehydrated and needing IV fluids, says Schimelpfenig.

Heres what to look for:

Severe signs of heat illness often take those symptoms towards their extreme. If a kid has thrown up or passed out or is showing signs of mental confusion, seek medical attention immediately.

After adisrupted year of activity, kids may be out of shape or out of practice when it comes to handling heat.If youre working hard, youre also generating heat internally in an environment that is hot, says Schimelpfenig. You cant really work out in a sauna for very long before youre just too hot and exhausted to do it.

To maintain body temperature and keep kids happy,plan extra water breaks, provide shade (parents might bring along small tents or umbrellas on outdoor excursions), and remember to remove your childs bike helmet while restingits one more way for the bodys heat to escape. Other ways to cool off include eating a chilled snack (bonus points for snacks that have lots of hydration, like chilled fruit), jumping in a sprinkler or visiting a splash pad (though Schimpelfenig is clear that water cools you better inyour body rather than onit), or planning your activities for cooler times of day (early morning is better than high noon).

Teaching kids to regularly assess how their body feels can empower them to ask for help if they feel an onset of heat illness symptoms. Parents can also consider gear that helps kids help themselves: light colored, breathable clothing; moisture-wicking athletic wear; personal water bottles;and snack options that include electrolytes.

Finally, its important to stomp out the myth that canceling some activities due to heat is a failure. High heat indexes are often the reason esteemed athletes have to change their plans, says Schimelpfenig. In fact, recently at the Olympic Games in Tokyo, the gold medal womens soccer match was moved due to temperature, while the womens marathon was moved up an hour to mitigate the effects of extreme heat. In those instances, indoor activitiesmay be the better option.

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What Parents Need to Know About Kids and Heat Waves - Outside

Weight loss, pain and anxiety – many side effects of the curfew order – DealMakerz

Posted: August 12, 2021 at 1:52 am

This study is a review of 17 studies from various countries outside the Nordic region, and deals with the effects of attendance restrictions introduced in geriatric care and health care during Govt-19 epidemics. This shows that these measures have had many negative consequences. Physical effects on patients / users include decreased nutritional intake, decreased daily activity, and increased postoperative pain.

Depression, aggression, and e.g.nsamhet. The concerns of the relatives were mentioned among others.

Its author is Karin Hugalius, who has reviewed 17 international studies from 2020 with Japanese researchers.

This is not entirely unexpected as there are many physical and psychological side effects, says Karin Hugalius, an ambulance nurse and researcher in crisis management and disaster medicine at Aurobro University, to Likardingen.

I was a little surprised, there were such obvious side effects. You can measure them in many studies such as nutritional intake.

The 17 studies reviewed came from the United States, the Netherlands, Italy, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, Ireland, Canada, Germany and the United Kingdom. One of the U.S. studies conducted research in several countries, such as Spain and Saudi Arabia. Affected facilities include nursing homes, immunization, IVA, neonatal intensive care and other hospital units. Most studies were quantitative, but there were also quality, mixed, and case studies.

Only two studies focused specifically on Govt-19 patients and / or their relatives. Some studies were conducted under a comprehensive restraining order, while others were conducted under partial restrictions. Six studies consisted of one patient perspective, eight relative perspectives, and two caregiver perspectives.

One of the two studies on nursing staff focused specifically on the experiences of physicians in nursing homes, and the other focused on different staff groups. For employees, visiting barriers and restrictions means spending more time interacting with relatives.

You may find that Dutch studies require more staff. If there are no relatives, caregivers should contact them in other ways. Thats an important lesson: visitor controls take time away from other work, says Karin Hugalius.

It is also a study that looked at the results of ending life-long treatment. Then the relatives did not have a picture of themselves and saw how the family member felt. This created ethical conflicts for employees and made the health work much more difficult.

What should you bring with you when discussing prospective research and visitor controls?

One important thing to know is that attendance restrictions can cause many negative health effects and can take a lot of resources from health care. You have to weigh it very carefully, so its worth it, says Karin Hugalius.

Based on further research, we have a lot to see. For example what impact does it have on the spread of infection. In what way can we deal with the negative consequences? If we can run meetings safely, I think we should do it.

Read the full review: Hugalius K., et al. International Nursing Courses. 2021; 121: 104000

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Weight loss, pain and anxiety - many side effects of the curfew order - DealMakerz

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Forecast to 2026 – Global Analysis and COVID-19 Impact by Type, Application and Geography – The Market Writeuo…

Posted: August 12, 2021 at 1:51 am

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Overview 2021 2026

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